CSAS Edinburgh

at School of Social & Political Science, University of Edinburgh, Chrystal Macmillan Building, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD United Kingdom

We welcome you to the community of South Asian Studies in Edinburgh. We are the major UK Centre focused on the affairs of the countries of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.


CSAS Edinburgh
School of Social & Political Science, University of Edinburgh, Chrystal Macmillan Building, George Square
Edinburgh EH8 9LD
United Kingdom
Contact Phone
P: 44.131.650.4129
Website

Description

CSAS brings together South Asian expertise across Edinburgh University to create a lively environment supporting the interdisciplinary study of the subcontinent as a whole. Outwith the University, the Centre seeks to relate South Asian Studies to the wider community, through links with the Scottish Parliament, NGO's and major educational and cultural organisations in South Asia and Scotland. We adminiter both junior and senior visiting Fellowships and are committed to forstering links and exchange programmes with other Universities. These include personal and research links with staff in the Universities of Delhi (JNU, Jamia Milia and Delhi University itself), Lahore, Colombo, Peshwar, Calcutta and Chennai. The Centre has porticularly strong links with South Asianist working elsewhere in Scotland (notably, the Universities of GLasgow, Strathcylde, St. Andrews, Aberdeen and Stirling) and with centres of Asian Stdies on the continent Europe.

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You are warmly invited to a research seminar by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. The one with the club grabs the buffalo (Hindi Proverb): Caste Dominance, Violence and the Politics of Policing in Uttar Pradesh, India Speaker: Shankar Jayaram (King's Institute, London) Date: Thursday 5th February 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/the_one_with_the_club_grabs_the_buffalo_hindi_proverb ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-02-02 15:41:13 GMT

You are warmly invited to a research seminar next week by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. No strings attached? The Indian coal mining expansion and community rights at home and abroad Speaker: PATRIK OSKARSSON (University of Gothenburg) Date: Thursday 22nd January 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/tbc7 ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-01-16 15:05:50 GMT

You are warmly invited to a research seminars next week by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. The Escape from Poverty: Lucknow Artisans in a Global Institution Speaker: Arun Kumar (Centre for Modern Indian Studies, Gothenburg Date: Thursday 15th January 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/tbc7 ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-01-08 14:03:58 GMT

You are warmly invited to a research seminars next week by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. BR Ambedkar and Reogranisation of States in Contemporary India Speaker: Avinash Kumar (Jawaharial Nehru University, New Delhi) Date: Thursday 4th December 2014 Venue: Sidney Smith Lecture Theatre, Teviot Place, Doorway 1, 2nd Floor, Room 2.520 Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/tbc7 ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2014-11-28 10:23:28 GMT

You are warmly invited to a research seminars next week by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. Hindu nationalism in diaspora (1946-1977): the early years of the Sangh Parivar’s global expansion Speaker: Edward Anderson (University of Cambridge) Date: Thursday 27th November 2014 Venue: Sidney Smith Lecture Theatre, Teviot Place, Doorway 1, 2nd Floor, Room 2.520 Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/tbc5 ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2014-11-25 10:45:37 GMT

This is a reminder about tomorrow's talk in the Spring 2015 semester programme of the CENTRE for SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES at Edinburgh University. Our speaker will be SHRUTI CHAUHDRY (University of Edinburgh) who will be speaking on - Now it is difficult to get married? Contextualising cross-regional marriage and bachelorhood in rural North India Abstract Based on eleven months (September 2012-August 2013) of ethnographic fieldwork in a village in Baghpat district of Western Uttar Pradesh, this paper explores the factors that account for some men’s inability to get married within the local region by focusing on three Hindu castes (Jats, Chamars and Kumhars). In the past, bachelorhood was not uncommon, particularly among the landowning Jats, as leaving men unmarried was a strategy that families adopted for economic reasons. However, in the present context, a significant proportion of men, are not left but remain never-married. The paper addresses why marriage is necessary and whether the compulsions to marry are the same for all men. The Challenges that men face are differentiated by caste, class as well as individual characteristics. Members of different castes pursue different livelihood strategies that have a bearing on their ability to marry. In addition, demographic factors (highly masculine sex ratios) make a marriage even more difficult for some men. Different (lower) forms of marriage arrangements such as types of exchange marriage, payments to the parents of the bride or dowryless marriages within the local context, relaxation in some norms of marriage such as those of gotra exogamy and cross-regional marriage have emerged among caste groups in response to the difficulties faced in arranging marriages. Yet, within each caste, some men remain never-married either because they regard bachelorhood as preferable to a cross-regional marriage (considered as the least favourable form of marriage) or the compulsions to marry are not experienced in the same way by these men as compared to those who have a cross-regional marriage. The paper also examines the implications of bachelorhood. Does it represent a ‘crisis of masculinity’? How are bachelors accommodated in family settings, both joint and nuclear? With increasing nuclearisation will there be an increase in single living? Venue: Seminar Room 1, CMB, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Date: Thursday 19th March 2015 Time: 4pm - 5.30pm ALL ARE WELCOME. The seminar group will re-convene afterwards at 56 North in Chapel Street For further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-18 11:36:32 GMT

You are warmly invited to the next research seminar by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. Now it is difficult to get married: Contextualising cross-regional marriage and bachelorhood in rural North India Speaker: SHRUTI CHAUDHRY, (University of Edinburgh) Date: Thursday 19th March 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/compulsory_marriage ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-13 10:46:30 GMT

This is a reminder about tomorrow's talk in the Spring 2015 semester programme of the CENTRE for SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES at Edinburgh University. Our speaker will be NAOMI APPLETON (University of Edinburgh) who will be speaking on - Mothers of famous sons in Indian religious narrative The rich narrative traditions of early South Asia focus almost exclusively on male heroes, yet female characters have much to reveal about religious and social ideals. This paper explores the mothers of early Indian narrative's main religious heroes – Rāma, the Pāndavas (in the Mahābhārata), the Buddha and the Jina – and asks what role their characterisation plays in the stories that India is most famous for. Using these mothers of heroes as a focal point, the paper will address wider questions about the ways in which early South Asian narrative was used to explore tensions between family life, political responsibility, and religious ideals. In so doing it will also shed light on both the parallels and contrasts between Hindu, Jain and Buddhist portrayals of mothers, and ask what we might learn from maternal characters about the preoccupations of these three rival religious traditions of early India. Venue: Seminar Room 1, CMB, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Date: Thursday 12th March 2015 Time: 4pm - 5.30pm ALL ARE WELCOME. The seminar group will re-convene afterwards at 56 North in Chapel Street For further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-11 16:09:54 GMT

You are warmly invited to the next research seminar by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. Mothers of famous sons in Indian religious narrative Speaker: NAOMI APPLETON, (University of Edinburgh) Date: Thursday 12th March 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/mothers_of_famous_sons ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-10 00:28:00 GMT

This is a reminder about tomorrow's talk in the Spring 2015 semester programme of the CENTRE for SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES at Edinburgh University. Our speaker will be HEID JERSTAD (University of Edinburgh) who will be speaking on - Cold and illness: weathering the body in southern Himachal Pradesh Villagers in Gau in Himachal Pradesh regarded the cold and particularly the cold winter rain as a threat to health. The problem with this is that an ill body is one which cannot work. Illness thus threatens the working unit of the agricultural household. How would the people of Gau act to protect themselves from the winter cold? What practices, structures and materials would they use? Through learning about this, it should be possible to understand more about how the winter cold, and that of the winter rain, would shape life in Gau. Venue: Seminar Room 1, CMB, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Date: Thursday 5th March 2015 Time: 4pm - 5.30pm ALL ARE WELCOME. The seminar group will re-convene afterwards at 56 North in Chapel Street For further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-04 13:10:19 GMT

You are warmly invited to the next research seminar by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. Cold and illness: weathering the body in southern Himachal Pradesh Speaker: HEID JERSTAD, (University of Edinburgh) Date: Thursday 5th March 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/cold_and_illness ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-03-03 13:42:17 GMT

This is a reminder about tomorrow's talk in the Spring 2015 semester programme of the CENTRE for SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES at Edinburgh University. Our speaker will be MIZUHO MATSUO (National Museum of Ethnology, Japan) who will be speaking on - The Cultural formation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies in India The process of forming a family with the help of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) differs culturally. In India, intended parents are highly likely to select and favour donated gametes and surrogate mothers according to the caste history of the donors. However, the most significant factor appears to be religious category, such as Hindu or Muslim. These categories are sometimes thought to represent different ethnic groups in India, therefore medical doctors and agents prefer to avoid mixing them in the process of treatment in advance. Inter-communal conflicts in society also affect the selection and practices of surrogacy. Regulations and taboos concerning diet during pregnancy, and attitudes to breast feeding during the surrogacy also reflect cultural concerns regarding bodily substances and relatedness in India, which are not apparently mentioned and perceived among intended parents from abroad. Based on my field research on surrogacy in Anand (Gujarat) and Mumbai (Maharashtra), I will discuss how newly-introduced reproductive technologies have been perceived and used in Indian society. I will focus on cultural conflicts and negotiations that have emerged following the introduction of ARTs. Venue: Seminar Room 1, CMB, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Date: Thursday 26th February 2015 Time: 4pm - 5.30pm ALL ARE WELCOME. The seminar group will re-convene afterwards at 56 North in Chapel Street For further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-02-25 10:34:02 GMT

You are warmly invited to the next research seminar by the Centre for South Asian Studies at Edinburgh University. Other Spaces: The Lived Space of Nazma, Hamida, Johra and Sohail from a Waste Picking Community in Calcutta, India Speaker: NANDINI SEN, (Goethe University Frankfurt) Date: Thursday 12th February 2015 Venue: Seminar Room 1, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Time: 4-5.30pm Further details here: http://www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2014_2015/tbc11 ALL ARE WELCOME. We will convene afterwards for drinks in 56 North, Chapel Street For abstracts and further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh please see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-02-06 13:52:39 GMT

This is a reminder about tomorrow's talk in the Spring 2015 semester programme of the CENTRE for SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES at Edinburgh University. Our speaker will be Shankar Jayaram (King's Institute, London) who will be speaking on - The one with the club grabs the buffalo (Hindi Proverb): Caste Dominance, Violence and the Politics of Policing in Uttar Pradesh, India Access to the police has been a major hallmark of dominance in the post-independence period. The power of the police over the lives of the poor is particularly significant because the police are the most visible and most frequent agents of the state. As the majority of Indians work outside the formal economy their business and livelihoods is outside the formal regulatory framework of the state. However, as the state’s frontline agents- police officers and the constabulary play a major role in policing the informal economy. For the urban economy, relations with the police are very clear way of measuring differences between political regimes, and also highlighting the core social constituencies of difference political parties. The political party in power has the ability to steer the police according to its political priorities. Policing is an aspect of the polity that is more easily disembedded from material political economies. The low-caste political party the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) was able to deliver on its agenda of better policing, particularly for the poor. Rao observes that “dominance is characterised by power of command, political power is characterized by the state’s monopoly over the legitimate use of force” (Rao, 1989,41). The BSP’s emphasis on the centralization of bureaucratic chain of command resulted in a significant substantive difference from the opposition Samajwadi Party’s decentralized approach to policing. The use of police, and the central state as bulwark against the dominance and violence of locally powerful castes provided a major improvement in the lives of the urban poor. There has been a serious deterioration in relations between the police and the urban poor since the BSP left office. This has particularly hit the Muslim community very hard, as this community is most alienated from the state. As with state-business relations, it appears that the structure of a political party, as well its political priorities plays an important role in determining how it governs. Analyzing how the police operate under two difference administrations brings this point to the forefront. Venue: Seminar Room 1, CMB, 15a George Square, Edinburgh Date: Thursday 5th February 2015 Time: 4pm - 5.30pm ALL ARE WELCOME. The seminar group will re-convene afterwards at 56 North in Chapel Street For further information on upcoming seminars and events at CSAS Edinburgh see www.csas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series and visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CSASEdinburgh

Published on 2015-02-04 15:19:19 GMT

A Centre for South Asian Studies Writing Retreat is scheduled for June 15th-17th 2014 at THE BURN - a Georgian House set amidst verdant fields in the Highlands. The topics for discussion will include Fieldwork Experiences, The Viva and Process of Writing Up, Publishing Your Research, and Applying for Jobs and Research Grants. We hope that these discussions will be useful to people at various stages in the completion of their PhDs. There will also be plenty of free time for participants to simply relax and think in an environment that is pleasant and conducive. Participation is free (all costs of transport, food and accommodation are covered). Please contact the centre secretary Ada Munns <Ada.Munns@ed.ac.uk> as soon as possible if you are interested in attending.

Published on 2014-06-04 19:07:19 GMT

PIYUSH ROY (PhD South Asian Studies) has just been awarded the Sir Malcolm Darling Memorial Prize for community service by the Principal of Edinburgh University (this in addition to the Sue Grant prize he received earlier this year). Congratulations Piyush.

Published on 2014-06-04 18:43:42 GMT

Dr. SATYAPRIYA ROUT will be giving a talk at IASH (2 Hope Park Square, Edinburgh) next Wednesday, 11 June at 1 pm. Title: Between Local and Global: Environmentalism and Environmental Movements in India and UK All are welcome.

Published on 2014-06-04 18:38:33 GMT

You are warmly invited once again to the Edinburgh Centre for South Asian Studies FRIDAY MORNING COFFEE MEET. This will be every Friday until June from 11-12am. Coffee and cups will be provided, you just have to drop in. We will be meeting again this week (May 30th) in meeting room 1 on the first floor of the Chrystal Macmillan Building, George Square. We very much look forward to seeing you

Published on 2014-05-22 16:52:59 GMT

EXTRA TICKETS FOR MAY 23 TRIP TO GLENCOE (SCOTLAND) FOR 10 POUNDS ONLY... Hello All, I have two spare tickets to a very popular and beautiful day trip to the Glencoes (in mid-Scotlands, where Kuch Kuch Hota Hai was shot) organised by the Edinburgh University on Friday (May 23 from 9am-6pm - start from and return to George Square campus). The tickets cost only 10 pounds and include complimentary lunch. If you or any of your friends are keen, please feel free to drop me a mail here or better call on 07719475376 for a quick pick... Cheers, Piyush