Massage Addict Brampton

at 17 Worthington Ave. Unit #18 , L7A 2Y7

We are Brampton's first membership based massage therapy clinic. It is our goal to make massage therapy a luxury that everyone can afford in Brampton!


Massage Addict Brampton
17 Worthington Ave. Unit #18
Brampton , ON L7A 2Y7
Canada
Contact Phone
P: (905) 486-0208
Website
http://www.massageaddict.ca

Opening time

  • Mondays: 09:00- 21:00
  • Tuesdays: 09:00- 21:00
  • Wednesdays: 09:00- 21:00
  • Thursdays: 09:00- 21:00
  • Fridays: 09:00- 21:00
  • Saturdays: 09:00- 17:00

What is Massage Therapy? Massage Therapy There are tremendous benefits to be achieved through regular massage therapy treatments from a Registered Massage Therapist. Whether your need is to have a moment of relaxation, reduce muscle tension or attain relief from chronic pain, a therapeutic massage can enhance your overall sense of emotional and physical well-being as well as your quality of life. Massage therapy benefits people of all ages. While it benefits the injured, the ill and the stressed, the strength of massage therapy in preventing illness and conditions before they develop cannot be overlooked. Massage therapy can be used in the treatment of both acute and chronic stages of conditions. The following is a list of conditions for which massage therapy, when provided by a Registered Massage Therapist, can prove beneficial: • Anxiety and depression • Asthma and Emphysema • Back, leg, and neck pain • Cancer • Carpal tunnel syndrome (repetitive strain) • Chronic Fatigue syndrome • Dislocations • Fibromyalgia • Fractures and edema • Gastrointestinal disorders • Headaches • Inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and bursitis • Insomnia • Kyphosis and Scoliosis • Multiple sclerosis • Muscle tension and spasm • Palliative care • Parkinson's disease • Post-surgical rehabilitation • Pregnancy and labour support • Sports injuries • Strains and sprains • Stress and stress related conditions • Stroke • Tendinitis • Whiplash Call us at Massage Addict Brampton (905) 486-0208 to book your appointment today or go online at www.massageaddict.ca

Published on 2014-11-04 19:53:15 GMT

We have 6 appointments available this Saturday afternoon starting at 12:45 pm. Its a great day to warm up with a therapeutic massage! Give us a call at (905) 486-0208 to book your appointment.

Published on 2014-11-01 16:15:05 GMT

Believe it or not, we have some appointment times available this bright and sunny Friday afternoon!! 2:00pm, 2:45pm, 3:00pm, 3:30pm, 4:00pm, 6:45pm & 8:00pm. Give us a call at (905) 486-0208.

Published on 2014-10-24 17:43:35 GMT

A good Saturday morning to all! We have some availability today for 1 hour Registered Massage Therapy at 11:00am, 2:24pm, 3:34pm and 4:00pm today. Gives us a call at (905) 486-0208.

Published on 2014-10-04 13:12:09 GMT

Good morning! We have some great appointment times available today for a nice relaxing massage! Treat yourself by giving us a call at (905) 486-0208 and invest in some ME time!

Published on 2014-10-02 14:22:04 GMT

We have appointments available today in both the morning and afternoon. Call us at (905) 486-0208 to book your appointment!!

Published on 2014-09-11 00:59:13 GMT

By Andrea Petersen Updated March 13, 2012 12:01 a.m. ET While massage may have developed a reputation as a decadent treat for people who love pampering, new studies are showing it has a wide variety of tangible health benefits. ×From around the web Girls Failed To Spot This But Guys With Hairy Chest Are... Research over the past couple of years has found that massage therapy boosts immune function in women with breast cancer, improves symptoms in children with asthma, and increases grip strength in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Giving massages to the littlest patients, premature babies, helped in the crucial task of gaining weight. Is massage just for pampering or does it have true biological effects? A recent study showed muscles rebounded better if massaged after exercising to exhaustion. Andrea Petersen on Lunch Break has details on Lunch Break. The benefits go beyond feelings of relaxation and wellness that people may recognize after a massage. The American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society now include massage as one of their recommendations for treating low back pain, according to guidelines published in 2007. New research is also starting to reveal just what happens in the body after a massage. While there have long been theories about how massage works—from releasing toxins to improving circulation—those have been fairly nebulous, with little hard evidence. Now, one study, for example, found that a single, 45-minute massage led to a small reduction in the level of cortisol, a stress hormone, in the blood, a decrease in cytokine proteins related to inflammation and allergic reactions, and a boost in white blood cells that fight infection. Enlarge Image Aurora Photos There's been a surge of scientific interest in massage. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, is currently spending $2.7 million on massage research, up from $1.5 million in 2002. The Massage Therapy Foundation, a nonprofit organization that funds massage research, held its first scientific conference in 2005. The third conference will be in Boston next year. The research is being driven, in part, by massage therapy's popularity. About 8.3% of American adults used massage in 2007, up from 5% in 2002, according to a National Health Statistics report that surveyed 23,393 adults in 2007 and 31,044 adults in 2002, the latest such data available. Massage was expected to be a $10 billion to $11 billion industry in 2011 in the U.S., according to estimates by the American Massage Therapy Association, a nonprofit professional organization. "There is emerging evidence that [massage] can make contributions in treating things like pain, where conventional medicine doesn't have all the answers," said Jack Killen, NCCAM's deputy director. The massage therapy field hopes that the growing body of research will lead to greater insurance coverage for its treatments. Washington is the only state that requires insurers to cover massage therapy. About 8.3% of American adults used massage in 2007, up from 5% in 2002, according to a National Health Statistics report. Aurora Photos Elsewhere, private insurers generally provide very limited coverage for massage. WellPoint, WLP +1.32% for example, doesn't include massage as a standard benefit in most of its plans, but employers can purchase alternative medicine coverage as an add on, said spokeswoman Kristin E. Binns. Aetna AET +1.23% doesn't cover massage therapy as a standard benefit but offers members discounts on massage visits with practitioners who are part of an affiliated network of alternative medicine providers. Providers such as chiropractors or physical therapists, whose visits are often covered, sometimes use massage as part of their treatment. Massage therapists charge an average of about $59 for a one-hour session, according to the American Massage Therapy Association. Treatments at posh urban spas, however, can easily cost at least three times that amount. Most of the research is being done on Swedish massage, the most widely-available type of massage in the U.S. It is a full-body massage, often using oil or lotion, that includes a variety of strokes, including "effleurage" (gliding movements over the skin), "petrissage" (kneading pressure) and "tapotement" (rhythmic tapping). Research Findings A full-body massage boosted immune function and lowered heart rate and blood pressure in women with breast cancer undergoing radiation treatment, a 2009 study of 30 participants found. Children given 20-minute massages by their parents every night for five weeks plus standard asthma treatment had significantly improved lung function compared with those in standard care, a 2011 study of 60 children found. A 10-minute massage upped mitochondria production, and reduced proteins associated with inflammation in muscles that had been exercised to exhaustion, a small study last month found. Another common type of massage, so-called deep tissue, tends to be more targeted to problem muscles and includes techniques such as acupressure, trigger-point work (which focuses on little knots of muscle) and "deep transverse friction" where the therapist moves back and forth over muscle fibers to break up scar tissue. Massage is already widely used to treat osteoarthritis, for which other treatments have concerning side effects. A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in 2006 showed that full-body Swedish massage greatly improved symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients who had massages twice weekly for four weeks and once a week for an additional four weeks had less pain and stiffness and better range of motion than those who didn't get massages. They were also able to walk a 50-foot path more quickly. "If [massage] works then it should become part of the conventionally recommended interventions for this condition and if it doesn't work we should let [patients] know so they don't waste their time and money," says Adam Perlman, the lead author of the study and the executive director of Duke Integrative Medicine in Durham, N.C. Scientists are also studying massage in healthy people. In a small study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine last month, a 10-minute massage promoted muscle recovery after exercise. In the study, 11 young men exercised to exhaustion and then received a massage in one leg. Muscle biopsies were taken in both quad muscles before exercise, after the massage and 2½ hours later. The short massage boosted the production of mitochondria, the energy factory of the cell, among other effects. "We've shown this is something that has a biological effect," says Mark Tarnopolsky, a co-author of the study and a professor of pediatrics and medicine at McMaster University Medical Center in Hamilton, Ontario. A 2010 study with 53 participants comparing the effects of one 45-minute Swedish massage to light touch, found that people who got a massage had a large decrease in arginine-vasopressin, a hormone that normally increases with stress and aggressive behavior, and slightly lower levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, in their blood after the session. There was also a decrease in cytokine proteins related to inflammation and allergic reactions. Mark Hyman Rapaport, the lead author of the study and the chairman of psychiatry and behavioral science at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, says he began studying massage because, "My wife liked massages and I wasn't quite sure why. I thought of it as an extravagance, a luxury for only people who are very rich and who pamper themselves." Now, Dr. Rapaport says he gets a massage at least once a month. His group is now studying massage as a treatment for generalized anxiety disorder.

Published on 2014-09-04 14:14:08 GMT

Did you know that we offer 60 minute prenatal massages to both members and non-members at Massage Addict Brampton? We have the prenatal pregnancy pillows in our clinic so if you know someone who is expecting, then why not recommend they come in and experience a therapeutic prenatal massage!

Published on 2014-08-07 21:26:07 GMT

Here's Why You Should Book Your Next Massage ASAP The Huffington Post | By Sarah Klein There's no denying a massage is calming -- until you start feeling guilty for indulging in a little special treatment. A small new study excuses us all from the guilt: Massage therapy isn't just a way to relax, it's also a way to alleviate muscle soreness after exercise and improve blood flow, according to the recent research. Other benefits of massage have long been touted, but research is usually limited. Still, we think there are some pretty good reasons to book an appointment ASAP. Massage can reduce pain. A 2011 study found that massage helped people with low back pain to feel and function better, compared to people who didn't get a rubdown. That's good news for the eight in 10 Americans who will experience debilitating back pain at least once in their lives, Time.com reported. "We found the benefits of massage are about as strong as those reported for other effective treatments: medications, acupuncture, exercise and yoga," Dan Cherkin, Ph.D., lead author of the study, said in a press release. Massage also seems to lessen pain among people with osteoarthritis. It can help you sleep. The calming treatment can also help you spend more time asleep, according to research from Miami University's Touch Research Institute. "Massage helps people spend more time in deep sleep, the restorative stage in which your body barely moves," the Institute's founder Tiffany Field, Ph.D., told More magazine in 2012. In one study of people with fibromyalgia, 30-minute massages three times a week for five weeks resulted in nearly an hour more of sleep, plus deeper sleep, she said. Massage may ward off colds. There's a small body of research that suggests massages boost immune function. A 2010 study, believed to be the largest study on massage's effects on the immune system, found that 45 minutes of Swedish massage resulted in significant changes in white blood cells and lymphocytes, which help protect the body from bugs and germs. It could make you more alert. At least one study has linked massage to better brainpower. In a 1996 study, a group of adults completed a series of math problems faster and with more accuracy after a 15-minute chair massage than a group of adults who were told to just sit in a chair and relax during those 15 minutes. Massage may ease cancer treatment. Among patients receiving care for cancer, studies have noted multiple benefits of massage, including improved relaxation, sleep and immune system function as well as decreased fatigue, pain, anxiety and nausea. It may alleviate depression symptoms. A 2010 review of the existing studies examining massage in people with depression found that all 17 pieces of research noted positive effects. However, the authors recommended additional research into standardizing massage as treatment and the populations who would most benefit from it. Massage could help with headaches. The power of touch seems to help limit headache pain. A 2002 study found that massage therapy reduced the frequency of chronic tension headaches. And in a very small 2012 study, 10 male patients with migraine headaches noted significant pain reduction after neck and upper back massage and manipulation. You may even be able to reap the benefits without seeing a professional: Start by applying gentle pressure with your fingertips to your temples, then move them in a circular motion along the hairline until they meet in the middle of your forehead, WebMD reported. The stress reduction is scientific. Between the dim lights, soothing music and healing touch, it certainly feels like stress melts away during a massage, but research suggests a very literal reduction of cortisol, a major stress hormone. Chronically high levels of cortisol can contribute to serious health issues, like high blood pressure and blood sugar, suppressed immune system function and obesity.

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