National Gallery

at Trafalgar Square, London, WC2N 5DN United Kingdom

The story of European art, masterpiece by masterpiece. We collect and care for the nation’s paintings and we share them with the world.


National Gallery
Trafalgar Square
London WC2N 5DN
United Kingdom
Contact Phone
P: +44 (0)20 7747 2885
Website
www.nationalgallery.org.uk

Description

Exhibitions: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/ Events: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on Our social media code of conduct: http://bit.ly/1IN7xJt

How To Get to National Gallery

Rail: Charing Cross Station Underground - Charing Cross: Northern and Bakerloo Lines. - Leicester Square: Northern and Piccadilly Lines. - Embankment: Northern, Bakerloo, District and Circle Lines. The nearest Underground station with a lift is Westminster on the Jubilee, District and Circle Lines. Bus: Buses around Trafalgar Square: 3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 23, 24, 29, 53, 77A, 88, 91, 139, 159, 176, 453. (Many buses are adapted for wheelchair users)

Opening time

  • Mondays: 10:00- 18:00
  • Tuesdays: 10:00- 18:00
  • Wednesdays: 10:00- 18:00
  • Thursdays: 10:00- 18:00
  • Fridays: 10:00- 21:00
  • Saturdays: 10:00- 18:00
  • Sundays: 10:00- 18:00

Company Rating

538019 Facebook users were in National Gallery. It's a 1 position in Popularity Rating for companies in Art Gallery category in London, United Kingdom

926421 FB users likes National Gallery, set it to 2 position in Likes Rating for London, United Kingdom in Art Gallery category

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-08 09:30:00 GMT

Edgar Degas is famous as a founder of Impressionism but he was also a major collector of art. Watch our film on the paintings he possessed in full here: http://bit.ly/29rm2dF Book tickets for ‘Painters’ Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck’: http://bit.ly/28ICbet

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-12 11:05:00 GMT

This painting by Meindert Hobbema shows the village and church of Middelharnis in the province of South Holland. The view is remarkably accurate and has hardly changed since the 17th century: http://bit.ly/29rmIzK

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-12 09:00:08 GMT

Join us tomorrow at 6.15pm (BST) on Periscope for an exclusive, out-of-hours tour of our summer exhibition 'Painters' Paintings' with exhibition curator Anne Robbins. Find out how you can watch the broadcast here: http://bit.ly/29rloND

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-11 14:08:05 GMT

The view seen in 'The Sea near Palavas' has been identified as the coast near Palavas-les-Flots, near Montpellier. Despite being similar to Gustave Courbet's own paintings of the area, it is nevertheless thought that this work was painted by another hand: http://bit.ly/29rkzV3

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-11 09:01:06 GMT

In this painting by Caravaggio, a young boy recoils in pain as his finger is bitten by a lizard, hidden among the fruit. It's most unusual for a late 16th-century painting to show a figure so realistically in a moment of action, and for a still life to be so prominent: http://bit.ly/29uzc6h

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-10 13:30:04 GMT

Camille Pissarro was born #onthisday in 1830. His ‘Landscape at Pontoise’ is in our 'Painters' Paintings' exhibition, and shows the influence of Corot. Book now to visit the exhibition: http://bit.ly/28IGZ3B

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-10 09:05:02 GMT

Turner's 'Sun Rising through Vapour' was probably influenced by earlier Dutch painting. It's almost certain that the picture was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1807 with the title as given here: http://bit.ly/29ur9GB

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-09 14:05:06 GMT

We've recreated the way Frederic, Lord Leighton hung Corot's 'Four Times of Day' panels in his drawing room as part of our exhibition 'Painters' Paintings'. Book now to visit: http://bit.ly/28IGZ3B

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-09 10:05:02 GMT

Join us on Monday 25 July for a free lunchtime talk, exploring paintings in The Wallace Collection that were once collected by artists in the 17th century and beyond. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/29jobV4

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-08 13:36:06 GMT

Edgar Degas is famous as a founder of Impressionism but he was also a major collector of art. Watch our film on the paintings he possessed in full here: http://bit.ly/29rm2dF Book tickets for ‘Painters’ Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck’: http://bit.ly/28ICbet

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-08 00:05:00 GMT

On Friday 22 July, start your weekend at the National Gallery with an evening of special events at our Inspiration Late, including poetry workshops, drop-in drawing sessions and Renaissance selfies. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/29h155d

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-07 14:58:02 GMT

Willem van de Velde painting 'Dutch Vessels Inshore and Men Bathing' in 1661. The figures in the painting are probably by the artist himself, though they resemble those of his brother, Adriaen van de Velde, who was employed in Amsterdam to paint figures in works by other artists: http://bit.ly/29riCUP

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-07 09:19:09 GMT

You can see this self portrait of Frederic, Lord Leighton in 'Painters' Paintings'. Find out more about the art collection he assembled by visiting the exhibition. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/28IGZ3B

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-06 00:05:02 GMT

On Wednesday 13 July, join us for a free lunchtime talk with Betsy Wieseman, Curator of 'Dutch Flowers', and collector Brian Capstick, as they discuss the charm and attraction of Dutch flower paintings: http://bit.ly/29jguhN

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-06 09:00:10 GMT

Our Picture of the month for July is Claude's 'Seaport with the Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba'. Explore how Claude's glistening sunrise almost outshines a queen and her entourage, here: http://bit.ly/29jevKv

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-05 13:15:05 GMT

Learn more about the private collections of artists such as Matisse and Rubens at our season of 'Painters' Paintings' related events: http://bit.ly/29b3J8P

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-05 09:11:05 GMT

Happy 4th of July to all our US visitors! This view of Manhattan by American artist George Bellows can be seen in Room 45: http://bit.ly/29aTWzP

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-04 13:39:05 GMT

The artist Sir Thomas Lawrence was an admirer of Raphael. He managed to acquire Raphael's small but radiant painting 'An Allegory (‘Vision of a Knight’)', and kept it in his possession for 19 years. Find out more about artists' private acquisitions at our exhibition 'Painters' Paintings': http://bit.ly/28IGZ3B

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-04 09:05:03 GMT

The sitter in this portrait was Degas's first cousin, Elena Carafa, who lived with her sister Camilla and their mother Stefanina, Duchess Montejasi-Cicerale, in Naples. Degas visited Naples in 1875 for the funeral of his uncle, and perhaps painted this portrait at that time, when Elena would have been about eighteen years old: http://bit.ly/28WkRiN

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-03 15:30:05 GMT

We're delighted to announce our 2017 exhibitions! From 'Michelangelo | Sebastiano' to 'Australia's Impressionists', become a Member and enjoy free entry to all our exhibitions: http://bit.ly/20I7aHF

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-03 10:00:00 GMT

Drawing is the language of architecture. Discover the design concepts and history of the magnificent Sainsbury Wing and investigate its architecture both inside and out through your own drawings at our workshop on 23 July: http://bit.ly/28YBKwM

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-02 14:43:05 GMT

Lucian Freud acquired this small, little known painting by Cézanne in 1999. You can see it now on display as part of our exhibition 'Painters' Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck', which explores the private acquisitions of artists: http://bit.ly/28IGZ3B

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-02 10:05:02 GMT

Jacob van Walscappelle’s extraordinary command of minute detail is beautifully displayed in the many tiny insects and butterflies that hide amidst flowers and foliage in this painting. Discover the busy world of insects and animal life in Dutch Flower paintings for yourself by visiting our current Room 1 exhibition: http://bit.ly/28WT2a0

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-01 16:30:06 GMT

Vilhelm Petersen sketched this view in the Austrian Alps on his way to Italy in September 1850. He focused on the play of light on the mountains and the atmospheric effects of the clouds, leaving the foreground bare, his broad pencil drawing still visible. You can see our latest acquisition, 'Oetzthal', on display in Room C: http://bit.ly/28Wnp03

Published National Gallery on 2016-07-01 10:35:04 GMT

On 12 and 13 November, celebrate Dancing Museums and watch dance artists at work in the Gallery. Dance artists will be researching how performance, choreography, and movement can enhance understanding and engagement in visual art. Over the course of the weekend, you'll be able to drop in and see the artists at work. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2fxY2Io

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-05 10:15:05 GMT

Leaning back and with his head turned towards the viewer, the sitter appears relaxed in this portrait by Frans Hals. The vivacity of the brushwork gives the portrait a remarkable sense of immediacy. The sitter has not been identified: his age and the date (1633) when he sat for Hals are inscribed beneath the artist's monogram. The portrait hangs in Room 27: http://bit.ly/2ep40rf

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-04 15:10:07 GMT

Guido Reni was born #OnThisDay in 1575. 'The Adoration of the Shepherds' is one of the two very late large-scale treatments of the subject by Reni. This work is thought to date from about 1640 and was possibly commissioned by Prince Karl Eusebius of Lichtenstein. The painting hangs in Room 32: http://bit.ly/2b3xvOk

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-04 10:36:02 GMT

The sitter seen here in 'Portrait of a Dutch Commander (?)' has not been identified. He carries a commander's baton in his right hand. The bridge and towers in the background seem to be a reminiscence of those of the Castel Sant' Angelo in Rome. Their inclusion may indicate that the sitter wished to record a visit to the city: http://bit.ly/2ebmIXf

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-03 16:15:05 GMT

Artist Mat Collishaw reveals the influence of Caravaggio on his work in the latest video in our 'Beyond Caravaggio' film series. Watch in full here: http://bit.ly/2fhzsYC Book tickets for the exhibition, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2cwn3zr

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-03 00:05:00 GMT

Annibale Carracci was born #OnThisDay in 1560. He was the greatest of the Carracci family of painters. 'The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John the Baptist' is one of Carracci's most celebrated and copied easel paintings. It can be seen in Room 37: http://bit.ly/2eoAyBH

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-03 10:05:05 GMT

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun painted this portrait of Alexandrine-Emilie Brongniart in 1788. Alexandrine-Emilie was the daughter of the architect Alexandre-Theodore Brongniart. Brogniart was a friend of the artist who briefly took refuge in his Paris house during the turbulent autumn of 1789. The painting can be seen in Room 33: http://bit.ly/2eoSvjA

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-02 15:10:05 GMT

In January 1877 Claude Monet rented a small flat and a studio near the Gare St-Lazare, and in the third Impressionist exhibition which opened in April of that year, he exhibited seven canvases of the railway station. This painting is one of four surviving canvases representing the interior of the station. It can be seen in Room 41: http://bit.ly/2e3IX1g

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-02 10:10:05 GMT

Tickets are now on sale for 'Australia's Impressionists'. Escape the darkness of winter for the light-filled landscapes of the Australian Impressionists in the first UK exhibition of its kind, showcasing four innovative artists: Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder, and John Russell. Book now: http://bit.ly/2fBULYr Members go free and can attend an exclusive preview day on 5 December: http://bit.ly/1UoDjP7

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-05 00:15:05 GMT

In this painting by Matthias Stom, an old woman shields a candle against a breeze, the intensity of the flame causing her fingertips to glow. See this work and others influenced by Caravaggio at our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio', open until 9pm on Fridays: http://bit.ly/2dAr7P4

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-27 16:05:04 GMT

Johannes Vermeer was born #OnThisDay in 1632. Vermeer is one of the great Dutch masters, though only about 35 paintings by him are known. 'A Young Woman standing at a Virginal' hangs in Room 25. As with most of Vermeer's work, the painting is undated, although the style of painting and the woman’s costume indicate that it is a relatively late work: http://bit.ly/2eh5wLE

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-31 15:10:05 GMT

To celebrate Halloween, we're highlighting some of our sinister paintings. Cornelis van Haarlem's 'Two Followers of Cadmus devoured by a Dragon' depicts the gruesome story of Cadmus as told in Ovid's 'Metamorphoses': http://bit.ly/2eKRBhs

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-31 10:35:05 GMT

The stark lighting and naturalistic portrayal of the human body in this painting by Nicolas Régnier are clearly derived from Caravaggio. You can see this work as part of our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio', open until 15 January. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2dAr7P4

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-30 15:05:03 GMT

Today is your last chance to see Associate Artist George Shaw's exhibition 'My Back to Nature' in the Sunley Room. The exhibition unveils the culmination of Shaw's two-year studio residency at the Gallery. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2bV5dpO

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-30 10:05:03 GMT

Give someone a year of inspiring art with Gift Membership. With the highly anticipated 'Beyond Caravaggio' continuing into 2017, and an exciting upcoming exhibition programme which includes 'Michelangelo & Sebastiano' and 'Australia's Impressionists', there has never been a better time to give the gift of Membership. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/20I7aHF

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-29 17:25:03 GMT

This Halloween weekend, we're sharing the sinister paintings in our collection, such as Harmen Steenwyck's 'Still Life: An Allegory of the Vanities of Human Life'. The books symbolise human knowledge, the musical instruments, the pleasures of the senses and the skull, the symbol of death: http://bit.ly/2eqgdjd

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-29 13:22:04 GMT

Explore our exhibition-related events for 'Beyond Caravaggio', featuring a talk with contemporary artist Mat Collishaw, introductory lectures to the exhibition, workshops and a two-day conference. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2bLUP34

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-29 09:36:03 GMT

Closing on 30 October, this weekend is your last chance to see 'George Shaw: My Back to Nature' in the Sunley Room. The exhibition unveils the culmination of Associate Artist George Shaw's two-year studio residency at the National Gallery. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2bV5dpO

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-28 15:07:04 GMT

Francisco de Goya's 'A Scene from 'The Forcibly Bewitched' is from a comedy by Antonio de Zamora. The protagonist has been led to believe that his life depends upon keeping the lamp alight. The picture is one of six scenes of witchcraft painted for the Duke of Osuna in 1798. It can be seen in Room 39: http://bit.ly/2eaEOZr

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-28 11:35:05 GMT

To celebrate Halloween, we're taking a look at the darker side of the collection and highlighting our #SinisterPaintings. Spells are cast in the centre of 'Witches at their Incantations', the most ambitious surviving example of Salvator Rosa's scenes of witchcraft. The painting hangs in Room 32: http://bit.ly/2el23vO What are your favourite #SinisterPaintings? Download and share them with us on Twitter using the hashtag or comment below: http://bit.ly/2eKWKG8

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-28 09:08:04 GMT

This nocturne by the Flemish painter Adam de Coster is part of our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio', currently open until 15 January 2017, which explores Caravaggio's impact on European art. Book tickets here, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2dAr7P4

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-01 09:05:02 GMT

This painting by Frans Hals is not a portrait. The skull held by the boy is a reminder of the transience of life and the certainty of death. The exotic clothing recalls that used in allegorical and genre subjects by the Utrecht followers of Caravaggio, the so-called 'Caravaggisti': http://bit.ly/2f6MLya

Published National Gallery on 2016-10-31 00:20:04 GMT

You can see Caravaggio's stunning painting 'Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness' as part of our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio'. Book now to stand before this work of extraordinary intensity in person: http://bit.ly/2dOiwIu

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-06 17:05:02 GMT

Give a year of art this Christmas with National Gallery Membership, allowing free entry to our exhibitions and more benefits. With an exciting upcoming exhibition programme which includes 'Michelangelo & Sebastiano', 'Australia's Impressionists', and 'Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites', there has never been a better time to give the gift of Membership. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/20I7aHF

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-06 10:39:03 GMT

In February 1897 Camille Pissarro took a room in Paris at the Hôtel de Russie on the corner of the Boulevard des Italiens and the Rue Drouot, and produced a series of paintings of the Boulevard Montmartre at different times of the day. This painting is the only night scene from this series, and is a masterful rendition of the play of lights on dark and wet streets. Pissarro's 'The Boulevard Montmartre at Night' hangs in Room 41: http://bit.ly/2er9mpK

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-05 16:25:05 GMT

On Tuesday 8 November at 6.15pm (GMT), join us on Facebook for an online tour of Room 66 with our Head of Curatorial, Caroline Campbell. A rehang of Room 66 has brought together two works by one of the towering figures of Western art, Leonardo da Vinci. The live tour gives a unique opportunity to admire Leonardo’s talents as both a draftsman and a painter: http://bit.ly/2f78jLq

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-01 14:23:06 GMT

This month is Legacy Awareness Month. Throughout November, we will be sharing stories from supporters about why they love the Gallery. Learn how you can support the future of the Gallery here: http://bit.ly/2eL7DYp "I love the National Gallery. It has been such a great source of pleasure for me since my teens. I’m 80 now and still I love it. It’s lovely, really, to see young people and school groups in the Gallery, so wide-eyed, so eager, always asking questions. The National Gallery gives me such a lot, so it’s a privilege to give something back. It’s about the future, so that everyone can always come and see it, when they want to, just as I have done." - A visitor to the Gallery for over 60 years.

Published National Gallery on 2016-11-01 00:25:00 GMT

This year's Paul Mellon lectures are taking place every Monday evening until 6 February. These lectures will look at the late-1950s emergence of the Modernist style among American jazz lovers, influencing British artists of the 1960s—such as David Hockney and Bridget Riley. Tickets start from £7. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2jjqEG8

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-10 00:11:05 GMT

Tom Roberts infuses his painting 'Winter morning after rain, Gardiner's Creek' with a damp, cool light. Find out more about Roberts, and more innovative Australian artists, in our exhibition 'Australia's Impressionists': http://bit.ly/2gP9X44

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-10 10:06:01 GMT

Shortly after his arrival at the asylum at St-Rémy, near Arles, Vincent van Gogh described the 'abandoned gardens' in which 'the grass grows tall and unkempt, mixed with all kinds of weeds'. This view of these gardens was painted at the end of the painter's stay at the asylum: http://bit.ly/20QXsmb

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-09 15:34:03 GMT

Closing on Sunday 15 January, you can see Caravaggio's stunning painting 'Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness' as part of our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio'. Book now to stand before this work of extraordinary intensity in person: http://bit.ly/2dOiwIu

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-09 00:16:01 GMT

Louis Jean François Lagrenée was celebrated for his small-scale cabinet paintings of classical and mythological subjects. In 'Maternal Affection', three women tend to two infants within a sunlit loggia. Lagrenée’s allegorical depiction of motherhood is both tender and elegant, executed with his characteristically meticulous brushwork and harmonious colouring. The painting can be seen in Room 33: http://bit.ly/2hDnsnp

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-08 15:13:04 GMT

'Ballet Dancers' by Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas hangs in Room 44. This study relates to several other drawings and paintings by Degas, including the 'Ballet Class' in the Bührle Collection, Zurich. The pose of the foreground dancer adjusting her slipper is repeated in numerous paintings and a sculpture: http://bit.ly/2cFx7tq

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-08 10:16:02 GMT

The Fourth Plinth commissions have become a hotly anticipated and much-debated fixture in Trafalgar Square. They bring ambitious contemporary art to the heart of the historic square. Opening on 19 January, our free Fourth Plinth Shortlist Exhibition in Annenberg Court showcases the shortlisted proposals for 2018 and 2020 by some of the leading artists working today. This exhibition is your chance to have your say on what comes next. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2hUqWTM

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-07 14:26:04 GMT

'Fire's On' by Arthur Streeton shows the aftermath of an accident that Streeton witnessed while workers were constructing the Lapstone Tunnel through the Blue Mountains west of Sydney. You can just make out a figure being carried out on a stretcher. This dramatic scene features in our exhibition 'Australia's Impressionists'. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2gP9X44

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-07 10:06:01 GMT

Closing on 15 January, don't miss our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio', the first major exhibition in the UK to explore the influence of Caravaggio on the art of his contemporaries and followers. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2dAr7P4 If you are planning to visit this weekend there will be a limited number of Same Day tickets available at the Sainsbury Wing Foyer ticket desk. Please arrive early to avoid disappointment.

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-06 16:27:01 GMT

Sign up to our newsletter and be the first to know about new events and exhibitions happening at the Gallery in 2017.

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-06 00:02:01 GMT

George Stubbs's 'Whistlejacket' can be seen in Room 34. According to some writers of the period the original intention was to commission an equestrian portrait of George III, but it is more likely that Stubbs always intended to show the horse alone rearing up against a neutral background: http://bit.ly/2hp2iJq

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-06 10:07:04 GMT

'Portrait of a Lady in Red' was probably painted between 1460-70 and hangs in Room A. The profile view emphasises the woman's high forehead, a fashionable convention achieved by shaving or plucking: http://bit.ly/2hAxUtd

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-05 15:19:05 GMT

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-05 11:33:48 GMT

Wish you could escape the British winter? Come and visit 'Australia's Impressionists' and enjoy bright, sunny landscapes by artists like Charles Conder. This scene of 'Coogee Bay' rendered in delicate pastels is just one work in the exhibition. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2gP9X44

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-05 09:06:01 GMT

January's picture of the month is 'Samson and Delilah' by Peter Paul Rubens. Rubens depicts the couple here, in the dramatic moment immediately prior to Samson’s capture by the Philistines. Samson’s exaggerated musculature owes a debt to the figures of Michelangelo while the lighting effects and the dark shadows are influenced by Caravaggio. Rubens is acknowledging the impact of two of the most influential painters of this time, while at the same time asserting the originality and power of his own work. The painting can be seen in Room 29: http://bit.ly/2i5x739

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-04 15:35:03 GMT

Sir Thomas Lawrence painted this portrait of John Julius Angerstein in about 1790. Angerstein was a banker and collector. His art collection was bought for the nation in 1824 by the government of Lord Liverpool and formed the original nucleus of the National Gallery. You can learn more about Angerstein and the Angerstein collection here: http://bit.ly/2hAFJiJ

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-04 10:11:04 GMT

This sketch of Trafalgar Square in London was painted by the artist Tom Roberts, who features in 'Australia's Impressionists'. Roberts visited London for a second time in the early twentieth century, when he painted this scene with his back to the National Gallery. Book tickets to visit the exhibition and find out more about Australian artists, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2gP9X44

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-03 16:06:02 GMT

Valentin de Boulogne was born #OnThisDay in 1591. His work 'A Concert with Three Figures' features in our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio'. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2dAr7P4 This captivating image of a concert, one of his earliest known works, is surprisingly little known. Three youths provide musical entertainment; two of them sing while another is engrossed in accompanying them on the flute.

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-03 10:10:01 GMT

This portrait was eloquently described by Giorgio Vasari in his 1568 biography of Titian. He identified the man as a member of the Barbarigo, an aristocratic Venetian family. The most likely candidate is Gerolamo, who was 30 years old in 1509. He had numerous political and literary contacts and would have helped the young Titian on his path to success: http://bit.ly/2hoOFKi

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-02 15:33:04 GMT

Giovanni Battista Moroni's 'Portrait of a Man with Raised Eyebrows' hangs in Room 12. This unidentified sitter is wearing chain-mail sleeves and a tunic of a type worn under a breast plate. This is an example of the intimate portraits of small format which Moroni made of male sitters: http://bit.ly/2hArhag

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-02 10:11:06 GMT

Join us on 12 January to experience our exhibition 'Beyond Caravaggio' when the Gallery is closed to the public for a special evening viewing. During the evening, you can also hear an expert talk about the exhibition, enjoy a complimentary drink and a 10% discount in our shop. Learn more and book here: http://bit.ly/2gH8k8G

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-01 14:16:02 GMT

Happy New Year from all of us at the National Gallery. Here is Vincent van Gogh's 'Sunflowers' from our collection. Want to enjoy more art in 2017? Become a Member, and you can enjoy a range of exclusive benefits including free entry to all of our upcoming exhibitions, exclusive Members' events and much more. Join today: http://bit.ly/2huucRW

Published National Gallery on 2017-01-01 10:06:05 GMT

Claude painted 'Seaport with the Embarkation of Saint Ursula' in 1641. A comparison of this picture with Claude's 'Seaport with the Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba', also in the National Gallery, illustrates Claude's evolution of the theme of the seaport. In the latter picture, there is a move towards greater simplicity and unity of design: http://bit.ly/2hoPTVJ

Published National Gallery on 2016-12-31 15:15:04 GMT

Making plans for 2017 yet? Make sure you visit our exhibition 'Australia's Impressionists' before it closes in March. Book now, Members go free: http://bit.ly/2gP9X44 This vista bathed in warm sunlight was painted by Arthur Streeton. "The wind seems sunburnt and fiery as it runs through my beard," recalled Streeton of his time painting this work in Eaglemont.

Published National Gallery on 2016-12-31 10:05:05 GMT

Gustave Courbet painted 'The Diligence in the Snow' in 1860. A diligence is a type of coach, which can be seen here overturned in the snow. Courbet is said to have witnessed a similar accident when on a hunting expedition in the forest of Livier in the Jura: http://bit.ly/2hi0cLx