Playhouse Northwest Acting School

at 3270 California Ave SW, Seattle, 98116 United States

Playhouse Northwest trains actors who aspire to work professionally. The acting company is made up of people who've all trained together and work alike.


Playhouse Northwest Acting School
3270 California Ave SW
Seattle , WA 98116
United States
Contact Phone
P: (206) 938-3375
Website
http://playhousenw.com

Description

Our goal: To have our students train in a way that allows them to live truthfully in the imaginary circumstance. We offer uninterrupted and demanding year-round training for our students. You move through the training at your own pace. our progress Students will need to practice outside of class, This is your home work. Your progress depends on the amount of time and dedication you put into your practice. We believe this training will serve as a solid foundation, for your entire acting career. We strive to be the gym for the working actor and for those who aspire to work on their craft.

Opening time

  • Mondays: 20:00- 22:00
  • Tuesdays: 20:00- 22:00
  • Wednesdays: 20:00- 22:00
  • Thursdays: 20:00- 22:00
  • Fridays: 20:00- 22:00
  • Saturdays: 13:00- 16:00

Company Rating

193 Facebook users were in Playhouse Northwest Acting School. It's a 51 position in Popularity Rating for companies in School category in Seattle, Washington

367 FB users likes Playhouse Northwest Acting School, set it to 85 position in Likes Rating for Seattle, Washington in School category

Attention Actors! Casting for Drama/Superhero/Action web series to begin shooting in mid February. Union and Non union actors are welcome at this time. Rate: paid TBA. This is for season 1 of 3 seasons (15 episodes each) Alex- Male Cop, African American ,Early 40's late 30's,. Normal to athletic build. Approachable. Chet- Male cop,,Asian or Caucasian, 40's ,Athletic build and Attractive. Mieu- Female, Asian or mixed ethnicity, 6-10 years old, Dark Hair, Petite build. Social worker. Male, 30's, professional,scared. Deb- Female, Caucasian, blonde hair, 14-16 years old. Attractive, vivacious,bubbly, and kind. Auditions will be held the last 2 weeks in January. Please send your head shot, resume, and contact information to greg@flyingecko.com If interested, they will contact you with audition days and times. Thank you!

Published on 2015-01-12 20:30:52 GMT

Happy New Year! Classes start tonight!! YAY!! See you at 8:00pm!!

Published on 2015-01-05 20:58:05 GMT

Playhouse Northwest Acting School Presents: Jack Plotnick — "The Secrets to Booking Work That No One Is Telling You" Jack is a Hollywood actor, producer and director. You have seen him in "Meet the Fockers," "Seinfeld," "Glee," "The Mentalist" and "Criminal Minds," to name just a few. He coaches numerous Hollywood stars (see below) and has written an online book, "New Thoughts for Actors: A Practical Guide to Loving Acting." Check out his website, jackplotnick.com. Jack will speak at Playhouse Northwest Acting School on Monday, Dec. 29, from 8:00-10:00 p.m. Doors will open at 7:30, and there will be a Q&A afterward. Cost: $30 for the public; $15 for Playhouse NW students. Topics include: - The secrets to booking work that no one is telling you - How to free yourself from self-destructive thoughts and anxieties. - - How to approach film acting (dramas and comedies) - Emotional auditions and the myth of preparation - Short-circuiting the process of insecurity Celebrity Testimonials "Jack has an innate ability to communicate a sense of freedom. Our work together has allowed me to more reliably get out of my own way and connect to the material and situation at hand." — Zach Quinto (STAR TREK, HEROES) "I seriously couldn’t have done it without him. His words of wisdom are always with me." — Alyson Hannigan (HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER, BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER) "I've printed out every page of Jack Plotnick's website and made an "acting bible" for myself." — Wendi McLendon-Covey (THE GOLDBERGS, BRIDESMAIDS) ”(Jack) taught me things that were so fucking brilliant! They are things that have stuck with me and helped me as a human being in this world." — Liv Tyler (THE LEFTOVERS, THE STRANGERS, THE LORD OF THE RINGS) To register for this amazing event, please call Lisa Skvarla, Playhouse Northwest Acting School, 206-938-3375. Space is limited, so register early. Merry Christmas! — at Playhouse Northwest Acting School.

Published on 2014-12-17 17:57:35 GMT

Who would be interested in a Thursday afternoon class starting in 2015?

Published on 2014-12-15 23:21:01 GMT

This is our last week of classes for the year. If you would like to audit a class tonight @8pm, just swing on by and grab a seat. Our doors are open.

Published on 2014-12-10 20:45:32 GMT

I look forward to seeing you all tomorrow night at the Christmas Potluck party! It's from 7:00-10:00PM. Fun Fun Fun!! :))))

Published on 2014-12-05 06:46:16 GMT

Hope to see you at Turkey day workout tomorrow! Starts at 8:30am. All levels and ages welcome!!

Published on 2014-11-27 02:45:21 GMT

Thanks everyone who registered!. What a great turnout for tomorrow's workshop "Stunt Fighting for Film and TV"!!! YAY!! . Dress comfortably and wear layers. There is street parking and a parking garage on Hinds street you can use . (Parking is free). See you tomorrow at 1:00!!

Published on 2014-11-22 02:25:44 GMT

Stunt Fighting for Film and TV! (Armed and Unarmed Combat) Saturday November 22 1:00-5:00 PM Actor and fight coordinator Kendall Wells is teaching a comprehensive four-hour workshop on stunt fighting for film and TV. We'll take a completely practical approach to stunt fighting using the De Longis Method, covering unarmed fighting and weapons work. Regardless of your skill level, you WILL walk away with skills you can apply immediately on sets, and a foundation upon which much more can be built. Fee: $80 per person $40 for Playhouse NW students All payments must be made before Nov 21th, and are non-refundable except for medical emergency preventing a student from attending class. Ages 13+ To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375 Space is limited.

Published on 2014-11-13 02:34:49 GMT

This week! So excited to have Carrie Williams here! ( All registration must be in by Wednesday!) Every actor who wants to be professional should learn this part of their craft! Don't miss out! Take Action! The Business of the Business! Saturday November 8th 4:00PM -6:00PM This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, covers everything from branding and marketing, leveraging your social media, creating the best support team, and networking! Be sure not to miss this informative event. Fee: $40 per person / $20 for Playhouse NW acting students. To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375. All payments must be received by Wednesday Nov 5th and are non-refundable. Space is limited. Making the Move! Thursday November 6th 7:00PM -9:00PM Are you ready to move to LA but not sure what you need to do to ensure success? This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, teaches you 6 steps you need to take to increase your odds of making it in LA. There is limited space so register today!! Here is the link. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-the-move-seattle-ticket…

Published on 2014-11-03 20:24:37 GMT

Attention Actors!! November is right around the corner! Check out these upcoming workshops! Making the Move! Thursday November 6th 7:00PM -9:00PM Are you ready to move to LA but not sure what you need to do to ensure success? This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, teaches you 6 steps you need to take to increase your odds of making it in LA. There is limited space so register today!! Here is the link. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-the-move-seattle-ticket… Take Action! The Business of the Business! Saturday November 8th 4:00PM -6:00PM This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, covers everything from branding and marketing, leveraging your social media, creating the best support team, and networking! Be sure not to miss this informative event. Fee: $40 per person / $20 for Playhouse NW acting students. To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375. All payments must be received by Wednesday Nov 5th and are non-refundable. Space is limited. Stunt Fighting for Film and TV! (Armed and Unarmed Combat) Saturday November 22 1:00-5:00 PM Actor and fight coordinator Kendall Wells is teaching a comprehensive four-hour workshop on stunt fighting for film and TV. We'll take a completely practical approach to stunt fighting using the De Longis Method, covering unarmed fighting and weapons work. Regardless of your skill level, you WILL walk away with skills you can apply immediately on sets, and a foundation upon which much more can be built. Fee: $80 per person $40 for Playhouse NW students All payments must be made before Nov 20th, and are non-refundable except for medical emergency preventing a student from attending class. Ages 13+ To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375 Space is limited.

Published on 2014-10-30 01:18:32 GMT

For those with kids or for those who are a kid at heart:) This is happening tomorrow! FREE EVENT! This Tues October 28th from 5:00-8:00PM. All are welcome! Join us for a pumpkin carving event! Co-sponsored by Lee's Martial Arts West Seattle, Ola Salon & Spa, Hotwire Online Coffeehouse, and Playhouse Northwest Acting School If you're a last-minute pumpkin carver, don't despair. We have got together to bring you Festival of the Last Minute Pumpkin Carving. Free and family friendly, this community event is a great way to get your pumpkin carved and meet new people. We'll be providing snacks, beverages (cider!) and cutting/scooping tools. Bring your pumpkin (any tools you want to bring too) and join us for a fun evening. Hope to see you! xo —

Published on 2014-10-28 02:14:49 GMT

November Line-up of Upcoming Workshops! Check it out!! Making the Move! Thursday November 6th 7:00PM -9:00PM Are you ready to move to LA but not sure what you need to do to ensure success? This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, teaches you 6 steps you need to take to increase your odds of making it in LA. There is limited space so register today!! Here is the link. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-the-move-seattle-tickets-13298806087 Take Action! The Business of the Business! Saturday November 8th 4:00PM -6:00PM This 2 hour interactive workshop presented by Carrie Williams, a certified Professional and Career coach with more than 12 years of experience in the Hollywood casting industry, covers everything from branding and marketing, leveraging your social media, creating the best support team, and networking! Be sure not to miss this informative event. Fee: $40 per person / $20 for current Playhouse NW acting students. To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375. All payments must be received by Wednesday Nov 5th and are non-refundable. Space is limited. Stunt Fighting for Film and TV! (Armed and Unarmed Combat) Saturday November 22 1:00-5:00 PM Actor and fight coordinator Kendall Wells is teaching a comprehensive four-hour workshop on stunt fighting for film and TV. We'll take a completely practical approach to stunt fighting using the De Longis Method, covering unarmed fighting and weapons work. Regardless of your skill level, you WILL walk away with skills you can apply immediately on sets, and a foundation upon which much more can be built. Fee: $80 per person $40 for Playhouse NW students All payments must be made before Nov 20th, and are non-refundable except for medical emergency preventing a student from attending class. Ages 13+ To register call PHNW (Lisa Skvarla) @ 206-938-3375 Space is limited.

Published on 2014-10-22 00:41:19 GMT

Sat classes start today!!! 1:00- 3:00!

Published on 2014-10-04 15:29:19 GMT

Are you a Diamond in the rough? You put focus and effort into building relationships with the industry people who you want on your team. So when an agent or manager invites you to take a meeting, it seems like the obvious choice would be to show up looking polished and perfect. The thing is, industry folks are used to actors showing up looking polished and perfect. If you’ve been taking meetings and not seeing the results you want, maybe it’s time to try something new: maybe it’s time to embrace your diamond in the rough. Vulnerability When you act, you’re encouraged to be vulnerable and fully expressive. People relate to that vulnerability. It makes for powerful storytelling and compelling characters. So why should it be any different in real life? My invitation to you is to pursue representation from a place of brave vulnerability rather than doing all the right things. Sound scary? You bet! Show Them The Real You We all like to look our best, try our best, and do our best, especially when it feels like an advantageous relationship is on the line. However, agents and managers are people, too! They can’t relate with a perfect-looking person. They want to relate with a flawed, quirky, playful human being. So how can you practice being a little more vulnerable in your communication with industry professionals? Let’s say that you feel most joyful when you hang out with your Ultimate Frisbee team at the dive bar after a game. You’d be wearing your hair up in a ponytail if you’re a woman, or maybe you wouldn’t have shaved that day if you’re a man. You’d probably have on a pair of jeans and a t-shirt. I say, let that relaxed, fun-loving, friendly person run your marketing. Everyone wants to be friends with someone who enjoys life and is comfortable enough to just be their self. Pattern Interrupt In marketing, this is what I call a pattern interrupt. It’s exactly what it sounds like. Agents are used to actors being formal and reaching out in the traditionally accepted ways, so when you show up like you’re ready to hang out with them at a BBQ, it’s going to make them sit up and listen. Now, whether they choose to work with you or not is going to be determined by factors outside of your control. But at least you’ve given them a chance to see the real you and determine if it’s a good fit. Be you! xo

Published on 2014-08-27 19:54:02 GMT

See you tonight at the BBQ!! . Its from 5-8PM!!

Published on 2014-08-21 19:25:40 GMT

Wow! Talk about coming to work, what a class!

Published on 2014-08-14 05:14:45 GMT

GETTING READY FOR A BIG CITY MOVE?? i KNOW SOME OF YOU ARE :) You’ve completed your actor training. You’ve saved up some money, and now you’re getting ready to make the bold move to a big city market. Whether you’re moving to New York, Los Angeles, London or Chicago, you want to make sure that you hit the ground running and move into a new city with the seeds of a few industry connections already in place. Check out these three tips for paving the way toward creating the actor life you’ve been dreaming of in a brand new city. It’s Always The Rule Of 7 The best marketers understand that it takes seven touches before the potential buyer will even recognize what you’re trying to sell them. These days, people are so inundated with information that our brains simply tune things out. If we didn’t, we could never get anything done because we would be so distracted. This means that in order to begin creating relationships with the casting directors and agents with whom you wish to meet, you have to get started early. Let’s say you’re planning to move to Los Angeles at the end of the summer. Spring would be a great time to define your target list and start sending ships each month. These people are your potential buyers, and they need a little time to begin to recognize your name. Create Your Agent Whisper Campaign You can think of this 7-touch process as your whisper campaign to build a little bit of buzz around your arrival. If you’re going to be in town over the summer looking at apartments, be sure to take advantage of that time when you could be meeting people on your target list. Start with an email. Send something super short – perhaps four sentences tops. Say something like, “Hi, this is Dallas Travers. I’m moving from Denver to Los Angeles in late July. In the meantime, I’ll be in LA on May 29th and 30th and would love to set up a meeting. Some of my past credits include…” Be sure to follow up the next week if you don’t get a response. After the initial email, send a postcard or One Sheet about a week before you come out to visit. Once you’ve arrived, call them directly. Say something like, “Hi, this is Dallas Travers. I’m here for a couple of days before I move to Los Angeles in July, and I’d love to meet with Mark to talk about working together. How possible is that?” It’s Not Personal Whether you get a meeting or not, keep in mind that it’s not personal. It could just so happen that you’re in town the week that this agent is dealing with a huge workload and he doesn’t have time to meet. It could be that he’s not in a good mood and doesn’t want to meet anyone that day. However, now you’re in the groove of sending out regular ships, and you’ve planted some seeds with industry professionals who can help you move forward. Once you get in the habit of reaching out, you’ll start to see things coming back around soon.

Published on 2014-08-13 23:21:56 GMT

Dear Playhouse NW members, There will not be any class tonight. Frank had a death in the family and Devielle and myself have film obligations and will not be able to teach. This is very rare and in fact has never happened. We are sorry for any inconvenience and we hope you understand. Please keep Frank and his family in your prayers. We will see you Monday! Team Playhouse Northwest

Published on 2014-08-07 00:49:18 GMT

Every actor understands the importance of a great headshot. A simple 8×10 picture can open a lot of doors for you if utilized correctly. Your headshot must represent the real you while showcasing your unique castability. That’s a lot of responsibility for one tiny photograph. Knowing the importance of a headshot, it’s easy to over think things. You can spend a lot of time exploring your essence, how others perceive you, your best angles, colors and outfits. Shooting new headshots is a pretty big deal, but it doesn’t have to be an arduous, painful process. I’ve identified six simple steps to help you finally capture your dream headshots. By following this easy plan, you’ll discover that getting the right shot is actually a piece of cake. Step 1: Draw character parallels. Make a list of 5-12 specific performances you have seen that resonate with you. These don’t have to be actors who look like you. They don’t have to be of your gender. They don’t even need to be contemporary. Just make a list of five. After you’ve made that list, describe each performance with one or two adjectives. Step 2: Select your power adjectives. Looking at your list of adjectives, select the top two to four that best represent the list as a whole. I call this process “nutshelling.” Perhaps you might select the following adjectives: vulnerable, endearing, and quietly powerful. Keep these words in mind and visualize an image of a person who possesses all of these qualities. Step 3: Create Your Characters. Use these adjectives to help create three specific character descriptions for yourself: dramatic, comedic, and a character driven role. After you’ve completed your character breakdowns, you’ll have three very specific essences that you can now capture in your headshot photo shoot. Here are three examples: Drama: (Suzanne) A social worker who fiercely protects the kids she works with. Her job is her life, so she has no time for romance. She’s often overlooked or underestimated by her peers because she has such a soft exterior. But underneath lies a force to be reckoned with. Comedy: (Josephine) The only unmarried member of a close-knit group of friends, Josephine often feels like an outsider. She’s clumsy, yet lovable. She’s well-read, but lacks street smarts. Josephine’s very unlucky in love. She gets nervous around attractive men, which often leads to uncontrollable bouts of the hiccups. All of this aside, Josephine’s naïve outlook on life allows her to give top-notch advice to her friends in need. Character Driven Role: (Candace) Candace got married very young. At the age of 35, she finds herself at the end of an abusive relationship. Candace works as a local cannery where she’s been earning minimum wage for the last six years. After loosing her mother to cancer, Candace digs deep and finds the strength to change her life for the better. Step 4: Get thinking. Identify specific thoughts or emotions each character experiences. Perhaps words that represent them or phrases they say. For example, Suzanne might say, “Don’t worry. I’ll protect you.” The phrase, “Always a bridesmaid. Never a bride” may represent Josephine. Candace might feel exhausted. Keep these thoughts in mind during your headshot photo shoot. With powerful thoughts or emotions in mind, you will easily capture the honest essence of your ideal roles. Step 5: Plan your wardrobe, but don’t over think it. How can you convey the essence of each character in the subtlest of ways? Remember, the best wardrobe adds to the energy of the character without being distracting. Step 6: Bring it All Together. Now you have three specific looks and three specific thoughts. Being an actor, the rest is easy. Just bring these thoughts and your wardrobe to your photo shoot. Then, as each different “look” or character is being shot, you simply think the thoughts of the character you’ve developed.

Published on 2014-07-30 21:50:05 GMT

Seven Tips to Become a Thriving Artist Keep Your Word Your word is your bond, so follow-up and follow-through. Say what you mean and mean what you say. Do what you say you will do. Don’t gossip. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama. Speak freely and openly about your life and career, but walk your walk. Remember, actions speak louder than words. Mind Your Own Business Bette Davis once said, “I do not regret one professional enemy I have made. Any actor who doesn’t dare to make an enemy should get out of the business.” The opinions of others are, quite frankly, none of your business. Do not allow yourself to be distracted or discouraged by what others think, or say, or do. Yes, accept advice and feedback, but never forget that no one knows you like you do. Don’t Take Yourself So Seriously When you take yourself too seriously, you create unneeded stress, worry, and disappointment. Your best work comes from a place of freedom and playfulness. When you adopt a make-or-break attitude, you stifle your creativity. Though it may be tough to hear, no one else takes your mistakes or questions as seriously as you do. You are not as important as your ego would have you believe. So, take a chill pill, set your ego aside for a bit, and play with possibility. Connect the Dots Contrary to what you might think, every aspect of your life is connected. Think about it. When you exercise, you feel energized and confident. This confidence helps you in audition or performance situations. An organized desk leads to peace of mind and more freedom. Your relationships with others reflect your relationship with yourself. The way you do anything is the way you do everything. It’s your job to connect the dots. Appreciate how your day job serves your artistic vision. Understand how keeping a balanced checkbook affects the balance in your life as a whole. Realize that now is the time to live the life of your dreams. Treat yourself like you’re already there. You’re Here to Work If you desire an income-generating career as an artist, you must also respect the business. You cannot thrive by just being an art-eeest. It just doesn’t work. Sure, you can be creatively fulfilled, which is fantastic! That’s kinda the point, isn’t it? If that’s all you want from your art, then step out of the business. Stop looking for an agent, stop attending workshops, and stop any marketing you may be doing. Instead, put up incredible plays, do a lot of great writing, paint, travel and create whenever you can. You’ll be happy you did. But if you want to make money and have a career in show business, you must be informed about your industry. You must be well trained. You must network, read the trades, and market yourself. Otherwise, you’re not here to really do business. Live Dangerously Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. Do the thing you think you cannot do. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’ You have to accept whatever comes and the only important thing is that you meet it with courage and with the best that you have to give.” Take risks. Live Boldly. When you feel fear, ask yourself, “What’s the worst that might happen if I take this risk?” The answer is that you’ll move past your fear. You’ll survive. You might even get somewhere. Don’t Think Most artists spend a lot of time thinking about what they want rather than acting upon their instincts. Don’t think your life away. Follow your instincts. Listen to your gut – it’s telling you something. When you wonder whether or not you’re making the smartest move, you’re likely to think yourself right out of taking any action at all. Every step you take brings new results. Those results determine what comes next. So, you simply must take action in order to achieve your goals. Don’t think. Just Move.

Published on 2014-07-17 01:45:39 GMT

So you booked a great role on stage or in a film and, soon enough, reviews of the work are beginning to pop up on different websites and in the paper. That’s great, right? Most actors dream of being glowingly reviewed for their work. But sometimes, the reviews aren’t great, and it can be a challenge not to take things personally. Here are a few tips to help you deal with the reviews that you wouldn’t want to share with your target list. Change Your Mindset First of all, welcome to being in the public eye. When you signed up to be an actor, you told the world that you are open to being watched and critiqued for the quality of your work, and now you’re getting just that. Remember that just because someone had an experience that wasn’t as good as you had hoped, it doesn’t mean that your work doesn’t have value. It’s just one person’s perspective, and it doesn’t need to affect the way you view yourself as an artist. Watch out for thoughts that might label the critics as “haters” or the “bad guys.” It’s their job to observe and report. When you can think of them as just critics doing their job, you will find it easier to move on and continue doing your work. Have A No-Read Policy It’s important that you don’t use reviews to determine how you value yourself. A lot of actors, especially stage actors, have a policy of never reading reviews. This way, the negative things someone might write won’t affect them, and they also won’t be influenced by a great review that crops up. However, if you want to collect positive quotes for marketing purposes, you can assign the task of reading reviews to a friend or family member who knows how you feel. If a review is no good, they can quietly place it in the recycle bin, but if the review is great, they can pull a few sentences out that really highlight your work so that you can include it on your One Sheet. If Everyone Likes You, You’re Not Trying Hard Enough When it comes to theater and film, your job as a creative artist is to entertain but it’s also to get people thinking. If everyone just agrees and raves about what a joy it was to watch your show, maybe you’re not doing your job yet. When people feel challenged or have the opportunity to see something in a new light, they will often feel resistant. It doesn’t mean the work was bad; in fact, it means that you are pushing the public to think in a new way. The opportunity here is to see constructive criticism objectively. Can you put on the eyeglasses of a student and take a look at what you can learn from these reviews in order to improve your craft? You might even thank those reviewers for encouraging you to take your next project to the next level. In a lot of ways, a negative review helps you hone your competitive edge. To me that seems like an even better gift than getting fantastic reviews all the time. What do you think?

Published on 2014-07-02 15:11:43 GMT

http://www.backstage.com/news/seattle-really-actors-paradise/

Published on 2014-06-25 14:25:23 GMT

For those who are interested. This is happening tomorrow. Playhouse Northwest Acting School is offering a free sample class as well as a community BBQ afterwards. Stop on by if you can! IT'S OFFICIALLY SUMMER BBQ BASH!!! When: Saturday, June 21, 4PM-6PM. (Or later) Where: PHNW Studio (3270 California Ave. S.W.)West Seattle Cost: FREE In addition — you are welcome to come join us for free acting class that day! If you have never been here before, consider this your FREE sample class, starting at 1:00 p.m. Whether you are a former, current or future student, you are welcome to come play with us. From there we will go downstairs and let the grilling begin! We will supply the meats — chicken, burgers and hot dogs — as well as the plates, condiments, silverware, music and fun! You are welcome to bring whatever you would like — side dishes, snacks, desserts or drinks. If you don't bring anything, that's fine too. It's only most important that we see your lovely face. Friends and family are welcome too. This is a community event! If you have any questions, give us a call at 206-938-3375. We look forward to seeing you soon, either in class, at the BBQ — or preferably both!! Professionally yours, Team Playhouse Northwest, (Devielle, Lisa and Frank)

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