Realtor Andy Hensley

at 661 Millwood Ave, Winchester, 22601 United States

Offers services related to Selling,buying,property management .Strive to make your Realty needs easy and cost effective.


Realtor Andy Hensley
661 Millwood Ave
Winchester , VA 22601
United States
Contact Phone
P: (540) 247-3215
Website
http://andrewhensley.xactsite.com/

Company Rating

87 FB users likes Realtor Andy Hensley, set it to 35 position in Likes Rating for Winchester, Virginia in Real estate category

Real estate category, Winchester, Virginia

Realtor Andy Hensley
661 Millwood Ave Winchester , VA 22601 United States

Offers services related to Selling,buying,property management .Strive to make your Realty needs easy and cost effective.

Renee Hodel ERA OakCrest Realty, Inc.
126 N Kent St Winchester , VA 22601 United States

This page is to share with you my new Real Estate listings, keep you up to date on events locally, share with you words of encouragement and laughter.

Debbie Wright - Realtor
302 S Braddock St Winchester , VA 22601 United States

Licensed Realtor in VA & VA with MarketPlace Realty in Winchester VA.Certified feng shui practitioner providing home and business consultations.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia.©2015. All rights reserved. 7 Way's to combat Clutter . The New Year is the time for a fresh start. It brings a feeling of starting over, and an opportunity to improve all areas of your life. In the New Year, take some time to complete projects you've been putting off for months. You can create an even better home for you and your family by decluttering and organizing your home. Follow these tips for easy and quick ways to de-clutter your home. 1. Keep things at arms reach: Keep items you use daily somewhere where they can be easily reached, whether that's in a basket, on a shelf, or in a cabinet. Store everything that is used sparingly on a higher shelf or in the garage or attic. It will be easier to find what you need when you need it. 2. Add shelves: If your home is cluttered adding more furniture won't help. Instead of adding a bookshelf or desk, add wall shelving. You’ll have room for books, picture frames, paperwork, and even a television without cluttering your home with more furniture. 3. 12-12-12 Challenge: This challenge comes from BecomingMinimalist.com, and is a simple project to add to your routine. Clean and organize by choosing 12 items to throw away, 12 items to donate, and 12 to return to a proper place in your home. This helps you organize, declutter, and give to a good cause all at the same time! 4. Garage storage: Make your garage your main storage area. Use old dressers and other furniture to store seasonal items and items you don't use daily. Paint the furniture the same color to create a unified look. 5. Get rid of broken items: There's no point in keeping items that are broken or unused, they're just taking up precious space in your home. If you haven't used it or gotten it fixed in the past six months, you probably never will. Throw it out or donate it to make room for something new. 6. Use things up: It's a habit to save special items for special occasions, whether it's fancy bath soap or an expensive spice. Stop saving these things for the right time, use them and enjoy them now. Use what you have before you buy something new to help keep clutter at bay. 7. Deal with one room at a time: Take it step by step. Organize and declutter one room at a time, makes it easier to focus on the task at hand. If you try to juggle too many rooms at once, it may never get done. Go through these tasks every few months to help maintain an organized home. A decluttered home can give you and your family peace of mind - and room for some - See more here...

Published on 2015-02-10 15:56:15 GMT

Housing Activity Loses Some Steam, But Positive Signs Crop Up Heading into Spring Home Buying Season Consumer Optimism Trending Upward Since Last Year Pete Bakel 202-752-2034 WASHINGTON, DC – Recent month-to-month volatility in the housing market has softened the ongoing recovery. However, the majority of the Fannie Mae National Housing Survey indicators on consumer attitudes have continued to move in a positive direction during the past year, which may portend a pickup in home buying and selling activity this spring. According to Fannie Mae’s March 2014 National Housing Survey results, the share of survey respondents who say it is a good time to sell a home climbed to 38 percent last month, compared to 26 percent at the same time last year. In addition, the share who believe it would be easy to get a mortgage today increased to 52 percent, compared to 47 a year ago, and tying the all-time survey high. Americans' attitudes regarding their personal finances also have improved – those who expect their financial situation to worsen during the next 12 months decreased to 12 percent, a significant drop from 21 percent at the same time last year, and the share who say their personal financial situation improved during the past year reached an all-time survey high of 40 percent. "The housing recovery continues to proceed in fits and starts. Rising mortgage rates and a lack of supply have dampened housing market momentum," said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. "However, we see several positive signs going into this year's spring home buying season, compared with last year. For example, consumers are less pessimistic about their personal finances, and more optimistic about the current selling environment and their ability to get a mortgage. Still, those who are pessimistic about buying or selling a home today tend to point to economic conditions as the primary issue, and most consumers continue to say the economy is on the wrong track. Looking forward, we expect to see a pickup in economic growth later in the year, and this may boost the confidence of prospective buyers and sellers." SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS Homeownership and Renting •The average 12-month home price change expectation decreased from last month, to 2.7 percent. •The share of respondents who say home prices will go up in the next 12 months decreased slightly to 48 percent, while the share who say home prices will go down decreased to 5 percent, an all-time survey low. •The share of respondents who say mortgage rates will go up in the next 12 months decreased to 54 percent, and those who said they will go down fell to 3 percent, tying the all-time survey low. •Those who say it is a good time to buy a house increased slightly from last month to 69 percent and those who say it is a good time to sell a house increased 4 percentage points from last month to 38 percent. •The average 12-month rental price change expectation decreased slightly from last month to 4.2 percent. •Fifty-two percent of those surveyed said home rental prices will go up in the next 12 months, a slight increase from last month. •Fifty-two percent of respondents thought it would be easy for them to get a home mortgage today, tying the all-time survey high first reached in January. •The share who say they would buy if they were going to move increased 2 percentage points to 68 percent. The Economy and Household Finances •The share of respondents who say the economy is on the right track continued on a downward trend – decreasing 2 percentage points from last month to 33 percent. •The percentage of respondents who expect their personal financial situation to stay the same over the next 12 months increased 4 percentage points to 45 percent, tying a survey all-time high. •The share of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago decreased 3 percentage points, to 21 percent. •The share of respondents who say their household expenses are significantly lower than they were 12 months ago fell one percentage point to 8 percent, tying the all-time survey low. The most detailed consumer attitudinal survey of its kind, the Fannie Mae National Housing Survey polled 1,000 Americans via live telephone interview to assess their attitudes toward owning and renting a home, home and rental price changes, homeownership distress, the economy, household finances, and overall consumer confidence. Homeowners and renters are asked more than 100 questions used to track attitudinal shifts (findings are compared to the same survey conducted monthly beginning June 2010). Fannie Mae conducts this survey and shares monthly and quarterly results so that we may help industry partners and market participants target our collective efforts to stabilize the housing market in the near-term, and provide support in the future. For detailed findings from the March 2014 survey, as well as a podcast providing an audio synopsis of the survey results and technical notes on survey methodology and questions asked of respondents associated with each monthly indicator, please visit the Fannie Mae Monthly National Housing Survey page on fanniemae.com. Also available on the site are in-depth topic analyses, which provide a detailed assessment of combined data results from three monthly studies. The March 2014 Fannie Mae National Housing Survey was conducted between March 1, 2014 and March 23, 2014. Most of the data collection occurred during the first two weeks of this period. Interviews were conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, in coordination with Fannie Mae. Housing Activity Loses Some Steam, But Positive Signs Crop Up Heading into Spring Home Buying Season Consumer Optimism Trending Upward Since Last Year Pete Bakel 202-752-2034 WASHINGTON, DC – Recent month-to-month volatility in the housing market has softened the ongoing recovery. However, the majority of the Fannie Mae National Housing Survey indicators on consumer attitudes have continued to move in a positive direction during the past year, which may portend a pickup in home buying and selling activity this spring. According to Fannie Mae’s March 2014 National Housing Survey results, the share of survey respondents who say it is a good time to sell a home climbed to 38 percent last month, compared to 26 percent at the same time last year. In addition, the share who believe it would be easy to get a mortgage today increased to 52 percent, compared to 47 a year ago, and tying the all-time survey high. Americans' attitudes regarding their personal finances also have improved – those who expect their financial situation to worsen during the next 12 months decreased to 12 percent, a significant drop from 21 percent at the same time last year, and the share who say their personal financial situation improved during the past year reached an all-time survey high of 40 percent. "The housing recovery continues to proceed in fits and starts. Rising mortgage rates and a lack of supply have dampened housing market momentum," said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. "However, we see several positive signs going into this year's spring home buying season, compared with last year. For example, consumers are less pessimistic about their personal finances, and more optimistic about the current selling environment and their ability to get a mortgage. Still, those who are pessimistic about buying or selling a home today tend to point to economic conditions as the primary issue, and most consumers continue to say the economy is on the wrong track. Looking forward, we expect to see a pickup in economic growth later in the year, and this may boost the confidence of prospective buyers and sellers." SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS Homeownership and Renting •The average 12-month home price change expectation decreased from last month, to 2.7 percent. •The share of respondents who say home prices will go up in the next 12 months decreased slightly to 48 percent, while the share who say home prices will go down decreased to 5 percent, an all-time survey low. •The share of respondents who say mortgage rates will go up in the next 12 months decreased to 54 percent, and those who said they will go down fell to 3 percent, tying the all-time survey low. •Those who say it is a good time to buy a house increased slightly from last month to 69 percent and those who say it is a good time to sell a house increased 4 percentage points from last month to 38 percent. •The average 12-month rental price change expectation decreased slightly from last month to 4.2 percent. •Fifty-two percent of those surveyed said home rental prices will go up in the next 12 months, a slight increase from last month. •Fifty-two percent of respondents thought it would be easy for them to get a home mortgage today, tying the all-time survey high first reached in January. •The share who say they would buy if they were going to move increased 2 percentage points to 68 percent. The Economy and Household Finances •The share of respondents who say the economy is on the right track continued on a downward trend – decreasing 2 percentage points from last month to 33 percent. •The percentage of respondents who expect their personal financial situation to stay the same over the next 12 months increased 4 percentage points to 45 percent, tying a survey all-time high. •The share of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago decreased 3 percentage points, to 21 percent. •The share of respondents who say their household expenses are significantly lower than they were 12 months ago fell one percentage point to 8 percent, tying the all-time survey low. The most detailed consumer attitudinal survey of its kind, the Fannie Mae National Housing Survey polled 1,000 Americans via live telephone interview to assess their attitudes toward owning and renting a home, home and rental price changes, homeownership distress, the economy, household finances, and overall consumer confidence. Homeowners and renters are asked more than 100 questions used to track attitudinal shifts (findings are compared to the same survey conducted monthly beginning June 2010). Fannie Mae conducts this survey and shares monthly and quarterly results so that we may help industry partners and market participants target our collective efforts to stabilize the housing market in the near-term, and provide support in the future. For detailed findings from the March 2014 survey, as well as a podcast providing an audio synopsis of the survey results and technical notes on survey methodology and questions asked of respondents associated with each monthly indicator, please visit the Fannie Mae Monthly National Housing Survey page on fanniemae.com. Also available on the site are in-depth topic analyses, which provide a detailed assessment of combined data results from three monthly studies. The March 2014 Fannie Mae National Housing Survey was conducted between March 1, 2014 and March 23, 2014. Most of the data collection occurred during the first two weeks of this period. Interviews were conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, in coordination with Fannie Mae.

Published on 2014-04-11 16:41:34 GMT

Developers Use Specialized Scents to Entice Buyers Daily Real Estate News | Monday, March 24, 2014 Some condo developers are trying to lure buyers by creating customized scents that are aimed at creating positive impressions of a building. Borrowing from the hotel industry, real estate developers are creating memorable signature scents to sprinkle throughout their buildings, from the reception areas to the fitness center to model units. For example, developers with the condominium One Thousand Museum, a construction project in Miami, are developing fragrances for the building’s reception area that is meant to “evoke the feeling of a beach breeze on a warm day,” despite the fact that the building isn’t on a beach. The developers have created a total of four customized scents for the 62-story skyscraper, including a citrus scent with a hint of dark wood for the fitness center and a creamy coconut with a hint of orange flower for the rooftop aquatic center. It has also developed a tea and spice scent for the spa area. "The sense of smell is something that's most memorable to people," Louis Birdman, one of the developers, told The Wall Street Journal. The building's units range from $5 million to more than $15 million. In Dallas, a new luxury-rental building, StreetLights Residential, is using a light floral scent in the sales center and lobby and a woodsier smell for its fitness center. The idea is to “try to touch on all five senses,” says Tom Bakewell, chief financial officer of StreetLights Residential in Dallas, who says the signature scent helps with the branding. He says that when clients view and touch sample finishes such as granite countertops, they also listen to music played in the background, and drink soft drinks, beer, or wine. The fragrance is an additional subtle marketing tool, he says. Key International’s new building in Miami is also using scents to enhance its woodsy, earthy-feeling lobby, combining sandalwood, vanilla bean, oak, and clove scent. Also, to get buyers to remember that smell, they’re using the scent on their sales materials and invitations to events too. “When you smell something beautiful, it’s part of your whole first impression,” says Liliana Paez, director of sales. Source: “A Whiff of ‘Welcome Home,’” The Wall Street Journal (March 20, 2014)

Published on 2014-03-25 01:23:21 GMT

The 5 Worst Things You Can Do Before Buying a Home Buy, Finance | Jan 28, 2014 | By: Credit.com | Share: More Prev | Next Cynics may scoff, but getting under contract on the right home can turn even the most stoic shopper into a bit of a dreamer. From paint colors to planting a garden, picturing yourself in that property is critical for many buyers. But leave a little room for pragmatism. Remember that getting pre-approved for a mortgage and even under contract isn’t a guarantee. That prefix is there for a reason. Loan pre-approval is not loan approval. You’ll have more hurdles to clear before a lender legally commits to funding your home loan. Buyers who don’t know any better can inadvertently add obstacles to that path — or even kill the entire deal —between contract and closing day. Some missteps can be costlier than others. Here’s a look at five of the worst things you can do before buying a home. 1. Go Credit-Crazy It’s almost become cliché in the mortgage industry, but the warning still bears repeating: Don’t buy a truckload of furniture until after your loan closes. The prohibition goes beyond sofas and settees — avoid obtaining credit for any major expense, such as a car, a boat or, yes, a new bedroom set. Be careful with even minor expenses. If you absolutely need to obtain new credit or accrue debt before closing, talk with your loan officer as soon as possible. New payments are going to affect your monthly debt-to-income ratio (and residual income on a VA loan), and not in a good way. Hard inquiries on your credit report could also lower your credit score. That might hurt your interest rate if you haven’t locked or even knock you out of qualifying range all together. 2. Shuffle Dollars and Cents Lenders will scour your most recent bank statement as part of the pre-approval process. It’s not like they forget about it after that. They’ll take another look at your assets and bank records again during the underwriting process. You’ll need to explain any unusual deposits or withdrawals. Lenders will require clear documentation and a paper trail if you’re putting gift funds toward a down payment or closing costs. Stuffing a wad of undocumented cash into your account is going to raise some red flags. 3. Get Behind on Bills Having a late payment hit your credit report before closing can devastate your deal. Payment history comprises about a third of your credit score. One solitary 30-day late payment can clip 60 to 110 points from your credit score. Maybe not a huge deal if you had an 800 score, right? Possibly. But if that 30-day late blemish is a mortgage or rent payment, some lenders will boot your application altogether. Many will require at least 12 consecutive months of on-time payments to qualify for a home loan. 4. Co-Sign on a Loan Co-signing a loan is arguably a bad financial move whenever you make it. But it’s especially risky during the mortgage lending process. It means you’re financially liable for someone else’s debt. Yes, that someone else might be the most responsible person on the planet. Lenders will still need to factor that new monthly obligation into your overall affordability profile. Adding one more debt to the list could stretch too thin your debt-to-income ratio and assets. 5. Changes in Employment Probably goes without saying, but losing your job is going to be a big problem. Even job-hopping can present some major hurdles. Lenders crave stable, reliable income that’s likely to continue. Lenders are likely to slam on the brakes if you take a new job in a different field. Or if you decide to start your own business. Or even if you get a promotion but see some or all of your income shift to a commission basis. The bottom line: Any change to your employment is significant. Keep your loan officer in the loop, and ask questions when in doubt. The last thing you want is to waste time and money on a home loan you’re never going to get. Throughout the mortgage process, it can also be helpful to monitor your credit scores for changes so you can know whether you need to address any problems. To do that, you can use a free tool like Credit.com’s Credit Report Card, which updates your credit scores and an overview of your credit report every month.