Mid Valley Funding & Investments, Inc.

at 3024 Beacon Blvd , West Sacramento, 95691


Mid Valley Funding & Investments, Inc.
3024 Beacon Blvd
West Sacramento , CA 95691
United States
Contact Phone
P: (916) 668-6568
Website
http://mortgagerateswestsacramento.com

Opening time

  • Mondays: 09:00- 17:00
  • Tuesdays: 09:00- 17:00
  • Wednesdays: 09:00- 17:00
  • Thursdays: 09:00- 17:00
  • Fridays: 09:00- 17:00

Company Rating

8 Facebook users were in Mid Valley Funding & Investments, Inc.. It's a 1 position in Popularity Rating for companies in Bank/financial services category in West Sacramento, United States

177 FB users likes Mid Valley Funding & Investments, Inc., set it to 1 position in Likes Rating for West Sacramento, United States in Bank/financial services category

What Is A Property Survey? When purchasing a home, especially for the first time, you are going to encounter a lot of terms and jargon you may never have heard before. “Property survey” is one such term you may encounter in the process, and it is often not considered one of the more important parts of the home buying process, but it is an essential part of any home purchase closing process and should not be overlooked. What Is A Property Survey? A property survey is a document, usually in the form of a map or sketch, that outlines all the prominent features of a property, including the house and the physical boundaries of that property. It can also include other items, such as natural features on the property, including ponds or lakes, and man-made features such as pools. These property surveys must be completed by a professional qualified to carry out a property survey, and usually have to be done within six months of any change of deed. Why Do You Need A Property Survey? In some states a property survey is required for a number of reasons. From the perspective of a home buyer, your mortgage lender will usually want to see a recent property survey of the home and land you are purchasing for their records. Also, you will need one for title issuing, and for your municipal office to calculate your property tax. It is also important to note that if you plan on doing any renovations to your home after you purchase it, you will need it for your contractors. This gives them a clear picture of the features of the property as it stands, and the boundaries of the property itself. What Does It Cost, And Who Is Responsible? In general, there are two types of property surveys-house location surveys and cadastral surveys-and in most cases it is the buyer who is responsible for the cost of the property survey. If you are just planning to get the required documents for your mortgage lender, the more inexpensive house location survey is the way to go. If there are any doubts about the property, however, such as whether a particular feature lies entirely on the property or not, it is a good idea to go for the more complete survey. In these cases you may be able to convince the seller that you require it in order to make a choice about whether you will purchase the property or not. It is always advisable to have a REALTOR® who will help you navigate through this process, and they can give you the best advice on making a choice that is right for you. While all this work may seem like a lot of effort to put forth for what may turn out to be just red tape, if there is a serious problem with the property you are hoping to buy and it goes undetected, what should be your greatest investment may turn out to be your greatest liability.

Published on 2015-03-03 20:47:13 GMT

What Is A Property Survey? When purchasing a home, especially for the first time, you are going to encounter a lot of terms and jargon you may never have heard before. “Property survey” is one such term you may encounter in the process, and it is often not considered one of the more important parts of the home buying process, but it is an essential part of any home purchase closing process and should not be overlooked. What Is A Property Survey? A property survey is a document, usually in the form of a map or sketch, that outlines all the prominent features of a property, including the house and the physical boundaries of that property. It can also include other items, such as natural features on the property, including ponds or lakes, and man-made features such as pools. These property surveys must be completed by a professional qualified to carry out a property survey, and usually have to be done within six months of any change of deed. Why Do You Need A Property Survey? In some states a property survey is required for a number of reasons. From the perspective of a home buyer, your mortgage lender will usually want to see a recent property survey of the home and land you are purchasing for their records. Also, you will need one for title issuing, and for your municipal office to calculate your property tax. It is also important to note that if you plan on doing any renovations to your home after you purchase it, you will need it for your contractors. This gives them a clear picture of the features of the property as it stands, and the boundaries of the property itself. What Does It Cost, And Who Is Responsible? In general, there are two types of property surveys-house location surveys and cadastral surveys-and in most cases it is the buyer who is responsible for the cost of the property survey. If you are just planning to get the required documents for your mortgage lender, the more inexpensive house location survey is the way to go. If there are any doubts about the property, however, such as whether a particular feature lies entirely on the property or not, it is a good idea to go for the more complete survey. In these cases you may be able to convince the seller that you require it in order to make a choice about whether you will purchase the property or not. It is always advisable to have a REALTOR® who will help you navigate through this process, and they can give you the best advice on making a choice that is right for you. While all this work may seem like a lot of effort to put forth for what may turn out to be just red tape, if there is a serious problem with the property you are hoping to buy and it goes undetected, what should be your greatest investment may turn out to be your greatest liability.

Published on 2015-02-17 22:47:49 GMT

What A REALTOR® Can Do For You As A Buyer When we think of selling a home, the services a REALTOR® can provide usually seem worth the cost of their commission, but what about as a buyer? What can a REALTOR® do for you as a home buyer, and is the commission worth the services they can provide? Here are five great reasons you should hire a REALTOR® when you are in the market for a new home! REALTORS® Can Help You Determine Your Budget-With a few simple pieces of information, a REALTOR® can help you pre-determine what kind of budget you may be looking at for your new home, and can match you with potential lenders that are right for you. REALTORS® Have Access To Resources You Don't-While a lot of real estate listings are available online, there are still resources and listings that are only available through a REALTOR®. If you are looking for something very specific, having their insider knowledge may be crucial to finding that perfect home. REALTORS® Can Read Between The Lines Of Listings-There are a lot of catchy phrases that often appear in home listings, and your agent can tell you what they really mean. REALTORS® Increase Your Negotiating Power-A REALTOR® cannot only increase your ability to negotiate things like price, they can also give you advice on things like contingency contracts and required paperwork. A REALTOR® Can Help You Navigate Through The Closing Process-The closing process can be a complicated process, and a REALTOR® can make sure all the details are addressed and that you are making a good financial investment. Purchasing a home is a huge financial investment, and having a professional REALTOR® looking after your interests through the process is important.

Published on 2015-02-11 00:46:57 GMT

Understanding Buyer Closing Costs Most people who are in the market for a new home are aware of the costs associated with purchasing a home and moving, but closing costs can be expenses that may be overlooked, especially for first-time home buyers. The amount of the closing costs will depend on where you live, the type of home you are purchasing, and the type of mortgage you are going to carry, but in most cases they can equal anywhere from two to four percent of the purchase price of your home. So before planning your home purchase budget, here are some hidden expenses that you may want to include. In general there are two types of closing costs, recurring and non-recurring. Recurring costs include things like fire and flood insurance, property taxes, and mortgage insurance; these are expenses that will have to become part of your monthly budget and in most cases are often anticipated by new home buyers. Non-recurring costs are one-time costs that are associated with closing a home purchase, and in most cases make up the bulk of extra expenses. Non-recurring closing costs usually include: Title Policies Escrow Wire Fees Delivery Attorney Fees Endorsements Recording Transfer Taxes Home Protection Plans Natural Hazard Disclosures Home Inspection Lender Fees Depending on your particular circumstances, the actually closing fees may include just a few of these costs, or even include ones that are not listed here. Purchasing a home is a huge investment and expense, and getting a clear picture of the cost before signing your name on the dotted line is important. Your REALTOR® can usually give you a detailed list of these expenses.

Published on 2015-02-03 19:53:51 GMT

Negotiating Contract Contingencies From The Seller When the housing market is up and sales seem to favor sellers rather than buyers, negotiation contract contingencies may seem like a lost cause. But there are always cases where you as the buyer can effectively negotiate purchase protection into the contract of your home, and you may even be able to convince your seller to throw in a few perks. Here are some tips to negotiating contract contingencies from the seller. Common Contract Contingencies Knowing what contingencies are often included in home purchase contracts is the first step in getting what you want from the seller. There are a number of contingencies that are commonly included in contracts, and while this list is not exhaustive, it can give you a good idea of what you may want to consider. Appraisal-This is usually required by your lender, and while traditionally it is the responsibility of the buyer, you can get it covered by the seller. Home Inspection-This important step can find any major problems with the house or property that could cause a decrease in value, or make it an unwise investment. Loan Contingency-This is a term in the purchase contract that allows a buyer to back out of the contract if, after making a good faith effort to obtain a loan, the buyer is unable to obtain the loan. The buyer must remove the loan contingency (agree to proceed with the transaction) within the stated amount of time or withdraw from the contract. If a buyer withdraws from a contract because of failure to obtain a loan, generally the buyer is entitled to a refund of his or her earnest money deposit, less any costs actually incurred. Early Occupancy Agreement-This agreement can speed up the usual 60-day closing period by allowing you to move in faster. Existing Home Selling Clause-This clause makes the purchase of your new home contingent on your selling your existing home. This prevents you from being in a situation where you may be paying two mortgages at once. How To Negotiate Contract Contingencies In most cases if the seller is happy with your offer, and is looking to sell their home hassle free, they are likely to offer at least a few contingencies to a buyer. The best approach is to inform your agent of any contingencies that are an absolute necessity for you, such as an existing home selling clause, so they can clearly express this to the seller and the agent representing them.

Published on 2015-01-27 21:37:02 GMT

Is An Income Property Right For You? The appeal of income properties and the potential for what may seem like easy money and early retirement have likely crossed the mind of anyone who has heard of this business venture. There is a lot more to consider before entering the income property game, however, than simply purchasing a property and watching the dollars roll in. Here are a few things to consider before launching into your new career. Can You Recognize An Income Property When You See It? There are a lot of features that make a good income property. Whether you are considering flipping it for a profit or renting it out to potential tenants, knowing what to look for is more than half the job. Can you realistically estimate what the cost of renovations to the property will be? Do you know what the value of the home will be after the renovations, based on its size, location, etc.? Do you know what the market rent would be for the property? If you can't answer any of these questions you either have a lot of work to do, or you may want to reconsider. Not Scared Off? So you think you can reasonably identify an income property and are still interested in making your first purchase. Here are a few tips for making that a success! Know Your Intent-Whether it's flipping or renting the property, you should have a clear picture before you make the purchase. Have an estimate of what the renovations will cost as well as the profit margin of the investment, both in the short and long term. Consider Splitting The Costs-Many people who enter the income property market reduce the risk by having partners. Whether it's a friend, relative, or business partner, this may be the right decision to minimize your risk in your first venture. Make It Your Business-Whether you plan on doing this as an additional source of income or you are going into it full time, realizing that this is now a business will prevent you from losing a fortune. You will spend a lot of time getting to know both the real estate and the home renovation industries, and the more you know, the more successful you will be. Deciding to get into the income property business can be a time consuming, but ultimately very rewarding, venture. Like any business, the effort you put in and the knowledge you have will determine the success you achieve.

Published on 2015-01-20 19:38:29 GMT

How To Handle A Motivated Seller Often ads for homes on the market include the phrase “motivated seller,” and while this sounds as if it may be to your benefit as a home buyer, what does it actually mean? If a seller is truly motivated you can benefit from a number of potential perks they may be willing to throw in to get their home sold, or they may even be willing to accept a lower offer than the asking price. Here are a few tips on how to find motivated sellers, and how to get the best deal possible. Is The Seller Really Motivated? Believe it or not, all “motivated sellers” are not really motivated. The phrase is often used by sellers and real estate agents to get a response from potential buyers. From the perspective of agents, if a seller is fairly insistent that they want a particular price for their home, which the agent feels is above the market value, they may use this phrase to encourage bids below the asking price. Sellers, on the other hand, may request this phrase be used whether they are motivated or not, in order to encourage a bidding war. Whether the seller is actually motivated or not may not always be apparent, but the best way to gauge the situation is by contacting the agent and making a low offer if you are interested. So The Seller Is Really Motivated! Now What? If you have put in a below asking price offer and it has been accepted, or a counter offer has been given, then you may really be dealing with a motivated seller. So what should you do to make the most of this situation while protecting your own interests? The first thing you should always do is be sure you are clear about why the homeowner is so motivated to sell. Is there something wrong with the house or the property? Getting a qualified home inspector to carefully check the property before signing anything is very important to protecting your investment. If all goes well with the home inspection, you may have the opportunity to negotiate other bonuses as well, including the appliances, financing options, or a renovation budget. Whatever the situation, it is always a good idea to have an agent represent you through the home buying process. They are your insider in getting the most out of the situation, and can help you wade through all the jargon of the home purchasing experience.

Published on 2015-01-13 23:57:43 GMT

How To Handle A Bidding War So you have found the home of your dreams, it has all the features you want, and it is in the right neighborhood. Even the price is right, but suddenly you find yourself in a bidding war with one or more people who also think this is the perfect home. This can be a stressful and sometimes even heartbreaking experience, but what knowledge should you arm yourself with before entering a bidding war with other potential buyers? Here are a few important tips to remember in order to get the house of your dreams without breaking the budget. Know Your Budget Having a good idea of what you can afford and knowing your target price can really prevent you from making a bid that you may ultimately not be able to honor. The best way to do this is to get pre-approved for a mortgage before you begin house hunting. That way you will be certain of what you can afford, and if you do find that perfect house you will be able to move quickly to make the purchase. Know Its Value While the home for which you are involved in a bidding war may be the house of your dreams, paying considerably more for it than it is worth is never a wise choice. To avoid getting yourself into this situation, do your homework before making an offer. Look at the value of similar homes in the area, and contact a real estate agent or expert to determine the fair value. Know What You Are Paying For Getting the results of a home inspection, determining what features actually come with the house, and knowing how much you will have to spend to get it in livable condition will give you a clearer picture of what you are paying for, what comes with the house, and what your budget can hold. Bid Smart The fears in any bidding war are that your bid will not be the highest, or that the bidding will keep raising the price higher and higher. To prevent this from happening your best approach in any bidding war is to bid right the first time. If you are prepared to bid, making your best offer first time around will prevent your bid from being rejected due to another higher offer. Bidding odd amounts can sometimes make the difference between your bid or another being the highest. In general, being caught in a bidding war for a home you really want is always a stressful situation, but armed with these few tips you can end up with the house you want at the price you are prepared to pay.

Published on 2015-01-06 17:32:25 GMT

How Much House Do You Need? While it may be nice to have a home with five bedrooms, an eat-in kitchen, and a four-car garage, how many of us really need this much space? The best approach is to look at a few particular aspects of your life and lifestyle to make the right choice. What Is The Size Of Your Family And Will It Grow In The Near Future? If you are a newly married couple who plan on having children, purchasing a family home with ample room to grow may be the right choice for you. Childless couples, retired couples, or singles may want to rethink the large home and opt for something a little more size appropriate. Do You Need Office Space Or Like To Entertain? If you use your home primarily to meet your daily needs, such as a place to sleep, eat, and relax, you may want to consider a home with a large den or office space and a formal dining room. Do You Plan To Stay In Your Home Long-Term? If you are just entering the housing market and plan to live in several houses or in several locations throughout your life, you really don't need your dream home the first time around. Buying a property that suits your lifestyle for the period of time you will live in it is your best strategy. These are just a few considerations you should take into account when finding the right sized home for you and your family. Having a clear picture of the type of house you need will make the task a little easier, and keep your finances in check!

Published on 2014-12-23 19:31:24 GMT

Hiring A Home Inspector You've gone to countless open houses, searched online for months, and have finally found the house of your dreams, but before signing your name on the dotted line there are a few key steps you should not overlook. When purchasing a home, hiring the right home inspector can be the most important decision you make. Knowing the condition of the house you are going to purchase cannot be left to appearances or promises, and some undetected problems can be even more costly than the price of the house itself. Making sure you have the services of a home inspector who knows what he or she is doing can prevent what should be a great investment from becoming a financial disaster. So what steps can you take to be sure your home inspector is qualified? Here are a few things to consider. How Long Have They Been In The Business, And What Is Their Professional Background? The housing market has steadily increased over the last several decades, and the home inspection business is booming. With new home inspectors becoming certified each day from a variety of programs, hiring the services of an experienced inspector can really make a difference. Though experience is always a good indicator of qualifications, also consider hiring an inspector who has a background in the housing industry, whether as a real estate agent or home builder. What Are Their Qualifications? With the incredible number of courses and schools offering certification in home inspection, knowing where your home inspector got their training and whether or not the course is actually recognized by the certifying body in your area is definitely worth the extra time to find out. Always ask to see proof of their certification, and make the necessary calls to the institution if there is any doubt. Do They Have References? This may seem an obvious question to ask any professional, but many people skip this step, and even fewer actually follow up on the references that they ask for. Always call the references that your home inspector provides, and be sure they can give you at least three recent referrals. How Much Do They Charge? While the costs involved in purchasing a new home can add up quickly, the temptation to try to save when hiring a home inspector should be resisted. Call several home inspectors for quotes, and if the one you have selected is considerably cheaper than the others, ask yourself why. Most certified and qualified home inspectors know what the competition is charging and will usually charge a similar rate. While all this work may seem like a lot of effort for what may turn out to be just red tape, if there is a serious problem with the property you are hoping to buy and it goes undetected, what should be your greatest investment may turn out to be your greatest liability.

Published on 2014-12-16 17:20:15 GMT

Getting To Know The Neighborhood Before Buying A Home There is a reason the term “location, location, location” is used so commonly within the real estate industry. The location of a property is one of the most important considerations when selecting a home, as it will affect the value of your home, your day-to-day life, and even your own and your family's safety. So what can you do to find out a little about the area in which you are considering a home purchase, and what in particular should you be looking for? Know Your Needs The biggest obstacle to finding a home in an area that can meet all of your needs is not knowing clearly what those needs are. While it may be nice to live near the lake, or by your favorite restaurant, what is it that you and your family will need and want in order to have an enjoyable and functional lifestyle? Facilities such as grocery stores, good schools, and community centers may be necessary for families, whereas access to theaters, good restaurants, and a vibrant nightlife may be important to young professionals. Get The Info When searching for your dream home, knowing where to look before starting out can help make the task easier and faster. So before getting started with the house hunting, do a little neighborhood hunting first. There are a number of resources online, from municipal Web sites to forums, that you can use to find out about prospective areas that may be right for you. Contacting a real estate agent is also another great resource in finding an area that can meet your needs. Check It Out For Yourself All the research in the world can never replace experience, and if you are planning to purchase a home you will want to be sure the location is right before making what will likely be the biggest investment of your life. Taking a walk in the area, trying out the local facilities, and getting to know some of the locals can really help you to determine whether the area will be a fit for you and your family. You may also want to check out the area at different times of the day, or even the year, if these are considerations that may affect your happiness in your new home. A little extra work can really mean not only choosing a home that is right for you, but making sure it is in an area that can meet all of your needs

Published on 2014-12-09 20:50:32 GMT

Buying A Home That Can Grow With Your Family If you are a first time homeowner, or are purchasing a home after a major life change such as marriage or having children, what should you consider to be sure your new home can grow with your changing family? The time and effort that go into purchasing and decorating a new home, not to mention finding it in the first place, means that you'll want to ensure that your home will be right for you and your family for years to come. So what should you look for in your new home so that it will give you enjoyment and be functional both now and in the future? Size Though a cute two-bedroom home may be right for a newlywed couple, this type of space will likely soon be outgrown if there are any children in your future or if you and your spouse like to entertain. You will also want to consider the number of bathrooms and the facilities in them. Having only one toilet or shower can certainly put stress on a growing family. Features Special features of a home, such as a finished basement, central air, and a large yard can make your home a more functional and enjoyable space, especially if you have or are considering starting a family in the near future. You may also want to consider the age of the home you purchase and its features or appliances, as this may lead to future costs that may put stress on your financial situation at a time when one spouse may be at home caring for the children. Location Location is also an important consideration when choosing a home that can grow with your family. Choosing a safe neighborhood is always an important point when selecting a family home, but you will also want to consider the proximity of good schools, community centers, and shopping. Also, facilities such as parks and libraries can make a neighborhood truly a great place for families. You may also want to consider the demographics of the area in which you are purchasing in order to be sure it is a match with your values. As the old adage goes, home is where the heart is, and choosing a family home that is right for your family can really make all the difference in having a happy, fulfilling, and safe family life.

Published on 2014-12-03 18:30:10 GMT

Buying A Home Long Distance The process of purchasing a home can be a complicated and stressful experience, but if you have to purchase a new home in another city the experience can become even more complicated. Whether you are relocating for a job, retiring to a dream location, or are just looking for a change, purchasing a home long distance has a whole separate to-do list on top of the already long list of things that need to be done to purchase a new home. Here are some tips to make purchasing a home long distance a little easier, and still get the home of your dreams! The Internet Is A Powerful Tool! The internet is a powerful research tool for learning more about virtually any topic, and purchasing a home is no exception. From finding a REALTOR® to searching properties, the internet is a great aid in finding a home. It is also a great resource for finding information about potential lenders, home inspectors, and all the other extras involved in buying a home. Though the internet is a great resource in the real estate market, like any information you find online, it is always important to be sure it is coming from a reputable source. Finding Web sites that are run by professional REALTORS® or real estate organizations is your best bet for reliable information. Hire A Local REALTOR® Your best approach is to be sure you have an agent in your prospective area on your team early on. They can certainly direct you to some great online resources and help you determine which are accurate and up-to-date. They are also a great resource for finding out which neighborhoods would be a good fit for you and your family, and the local amenities that are available to you. In general, buying a home long distance can have its obstacles, but with a little research on your part and the help of a professional REALTOR®, you can make the transition to both a new home and a new city easier and stress free.

!-- Global site tag (gtag.js) - Google Analytics -->